Jump to content


Photo

Does The Moon Disprove Evolution Timeline?


  • This topic is locked This topic is locked
44 replies to this topic

#41 jason777

jason777

    Moderator

  • Moderator Team
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2,670 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:Machining, Engine Building, Geology, Paleontology, Fishing
  • Age: 40
  • Christian
  • Young Earth Creationist
  • Springdale,AR.

Posted 11 June 2009 - 06:15 PM

Fortunately, geologists can differientiate between rapid burial deposits and slow background ones.


So can Creationists geologists and even Aethiests,when they choose to be honest.Thats why D. Ager admitted that the geolocic record is catastrophic not uniformitairian.He still believed in an old earth,but he could'nt find any evidence of it in the geologic column so he suggested that evolution and long ages must be between the catastrophic layers where there is no evidence.Spoken like a true skeptic.

Both actually. It depends on the type of rock. Limestones can be composed of nothing but fossils (bio-clastic limestone, chalk etc) but they still represent slow sedimenattion rates. On he other hand fossil assembledges such as the Burgess shale represent a sudden influx of mudstone which effectively "drowns" the ocean floor and preserves a "mass death" assembledge. As usual the real world is not as black and white and simple as you believe (wish) it to be.


Your correct,but limestone and chalk deposits in the geologic past are catastrophic in nature.The Cretaceous chalk has black flints in it that not only have no local origin,but are scattered from one side of the globe to the other.That does not occur at present rates and conditions.

"I was taken by a Turkish friend to visit a cliff section in Upper Cretaceous sediments near Sile on the Black Sea coast. ...what I in fact saw was the familiar white chalk of north-west Europe with black flints and old fossil friends such as Micraster and Echinocorys. What I was looking at was identical with the ‘White Cliffs of Dover’ in England and the rolling plateau of Picardy in France, the quarries of southern Sweden and the cliffs of eastern Denmark. …We have long known, of course, that the White Chalk facies of late Cretaceous times extended all the way from Antrim in Northern Ireland, via England and northern France, through the Low Countries, northern Germany and southern Scandinavia to Poland, Bulgaria and eventually to Georgia in the south of the Soviet Union. We also knew of the same facies in Egypt and Israel. My record was merely an extension of that vast range to the south side of the Black Sea. …Nevertheless, there is even worse to come, for on the other side of the Atlantic in Texas, we find the Augstin Chalk of the same age and character, and...found in Arkansas, Mississippi and Alabama. And most surprising of all, much farther away still in Western Australia, we have the Gingin Chalk of late Cretaceous age, with the same black flints and the same familiar fossils, resting – as in north-west Europe – on glauconitic sands." …Some general explanation is surely needed for such a wide distribution of such a unique facies pp.1-2 "...in north-west Bulgaria, again the basal conglomerate is largely composed of exactly similar purple quartzite pebbles (resting on Permian breccias also like those of midland England) Even if one postulates continent-wide uplift to produce the conglomerate in such widely separated places, it is very difficult to explain why the source rock is also so remarkably similar from one end of Europe to the other. …It is well known that the Newark Group of the eastern seaboard of the United States is exactly like the Trias of north-west Europe.. The similarities are almost laughable.. ...we still have to account for a general facies development in late Carboniferous times that extends in essentially the same form all the way from Texas to the Donetz coal basin, north of the Caspian Sea in the U.S.S.R. This amounts to some 170º of longitude, and closing up the Atlantic by a mere 40º does not really help all that much in explaining the remarkable phenomenon." The Nature of the Stratigraphical Record, pp.6-7.



#42 pdw709

pdw709

    Member

  • Veteran Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 102 posts
  • Age: 36
  • no affiliation
  • Atheist
  • UK

Posted 12 June 2009 - 08:15 AM

Your correct,but limestone and chalk deposits in the geologic past are catastrophic in nature.The Cretaceous chalk has black flints in it that not only have no local origin,but are scattered from one side of the globe to the other. That does not occur at present rates and conditions.


Cherts (flints) are fine-grained silica-rich microcrystalline rocks and form through chemical changes in compressed sedimentary rock formations. In other words they are the product of chemical reactions/precipitations during burial and lithifaction process and not deposited directly on the sea floor.

There is massive amount of evidence to support present day deposition rates for a wide variety of rock/sediment types. This evidence comprises the sort of thing that creationists typically INSIST on i.e. direct observable measurements. If such sediments are depositing slowly today then in order to invoke something different for the past you will need to:

1. Provide evidence of increased historical deposition rates.
2. Provide a mechanism/plausible reason as why these rates were higher.
3. Provide evidence to support your mechanism/reasons.

Unless you do, the default (and most logical) solution has to be uniformitarianism.

I hope you realise that your arguments are contrary to the views of 99.9% of all the worlds geologists (of any religion)? I suggest that you pick up a text book and do some reading - I would recommend Principles of Physical Geology as a starting point. ;)

#43 ikester7579

ikester7579

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 12,500 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Florida
  • Interests:God, creation, etc...
  • Age: 48
  • Christian
  • Young Earth Creationist
  • I'm non-denominational

Posted 12 June 2009 - 08:20 PM

Basically what you’re saying here is, as time progresses forward and the moon moves further from the earth, we’ll be able to see more of the sun surrounding the outline of the moon during an eclipse? This would infer that thousands of years ago, a total eclipse really meant that darkness covered the earth!
Just a thought…..  :blink:

View Post


Think of what kind of eclispe that would be for millions of years ago.

#44 jason777

jason777

    Moderator

  • Moderator Team
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2,670 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:Machining, Engine Building, Geology, Paleontology, Fishing
  • Age: 40
  • Christian
  • Young Earth Creationist
  • Springdale,AR.

Posted 12 June 2009 - 09:15 PM

There is massive amount of evidence to support present day deposition rates for a wide variety of rock/sediment types. This evidence comprises the sort of thing that creationists typically INSIST on i.e. direct observable measurements. If such sediments are depositing slowly today then in order to invoke something different for the past you will need to:

1. Provide evidence of increased historical deposition rates.
2. Provide a mechanism/plausible reason as why these rates were higher.
3. Provide evidence to support your mechanism/reasons.

Unless you do, the default (and most logical) solution has to be uniformitarianism.


Then swow us global chalk cliffs from the cambrian,ordivician,silurian,devonian,permian,triassic,jurassic,etc.

Without being able to demonstrate the same deposition as found in the cretaceous,throughout the geolocic past,then uniformitairianism cannot be the answer.

As Derek Ager pointed out,deposition at current rates are no where near the rates we find in the geologic column.

I hope you realise that your arguments are contrary to the views of 99.9% of all the worlds geologists (of any religion)? I suggest that you pick up a text book and do some reading - I would recommend Principles of Physical Geology as a starting point.


The majority rejecting the truth is what Jesus already said would happen.That comment does'nt do anything but confirm that as well.


Thanks.

#45 pdw709

pdw709

    Member

  • Veteran Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 102 posts
  • Age: 36
  • no affiliation
  • Atheist
  • UK

Posted 13 June 2009 - 09:07 AM

Then swow us global chalk cliffs from the cambrian,ordivician,silurian,devonian,permian,triassic,jurassic,etc.

Without being able to demonstrate the same deposition as found in the cretaceous,throughout the geolocic past,then uniformitairianism cannot be the answer.

View Post


Sorry, I'm not quite sure what you're asking here???




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users