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Problems With Radiometric Dating


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#21 Guest_Admin3_*

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Posted 14 April 2005 - 12:57 AM

Here's a good post about light: http://www.evolution...p?showtopic=138

#22 Method

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Posted 19 April 2005 - 02:45 PM

I have wondered about the argument that rates of decay, or the speed of light or some other such thing might have been different. For example, shortly after creation, maybe the speed of light was different or maybe things decayed at a higher rate at the beginning of creation.


This still doesn't explain the relationship between strata and age. The deeper a rock is in a series of strata the older it dates. Not only that, but the snail paced tectonic movement of plates is also recorded in ocean rocks. If this speed up happened then only the rock immediately around the mid ocean ridges should date young and no linear relationship between age and distance to the mid ocean ridges should be found. This is not what is seen. There is a strong correlation between the distance from the mid ocean ridges and the age of the rocks, and the linearity of that relationship is consistent with the current day speed of tectonic plates.

Again, it is not simply the ratios between different isotopes but the relationship between these ratios and the surrounding geology.

#23 st_dissent

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Posted 20 April 2005 - 07:12 AM

I have wondered about the argument that rates of decay, or the speed of light or some other such thing might have been different. For example, shortly after creation, maybe the speed of light was different or maybe things decayed at a higher rate at the beginning of creation.


In QED it is assumed that the photon has non-zero mass. If photons have non-zero mass then the upper limit to the speed of light could be variable, however, I doubt it is a significant variation.

#24 Method

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Posted 12 May 2005 - 10:39 AM

Bumping to top for crystaleaglesprings. One of CES's posts would fit well in this thread. Just trying to make it easier to find.




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