Jump to content


Photo

Fjuri And Mike Start A Worldview From Scratch


  • Please log in to reply
69 replies to this topic

#41 Mike Summers

Mike Summers

    Veteran Member

  • Veteran Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 3,510 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:Information theory, electronics, videography, writing, human psychology, psychotherapy
  • Age: 61
  • Christian
  • Creationist
  • Detroit Michigan area

Posted 20 November 2013 - 08:43 AM

lol  smile.png

We are in the one month peace fest. I think we have another 2 and 1/2 weeks.



#42 Mike Summers

Mike Summers

    Veteran Member

  • Veteran Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 3,510 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:Information theory, electronics, videography, writing, human psychology, psychotherapy
  • Age: 61
  • Christian
  • Creationist
  • Detroit Michigan area

Posted 20 November 2013 - 09:06 AM

Wow! Another road block cleared.

I think you are gettig it.


"A" may actually be considered a question  that initiates pur memory function and the activation of our belief system.

 

Our beliefs are stored in our mind just below conscious level. For example, "What is my name?" Returned answer, "Fjuri."

 

Therefore, a question will cause information to be retrieved (our belief of what our name is). The activation of our memory function is always caused by a question (stimuli) internal or external.

 

At A Fjuri clams to know there is no God (atheism) This is what activates Mike's belief system and philosophical concepts about his dealings with people that claim atheism. B can be brokeen down into two parts, Irrational beliefs  (Ib's) irrational beliefs and (Rb's) rational beliefs.

 

(Rb's) result in a mnimum of conflict and  our continued existence.  They cause appropriate concern instead of rage or extreme anger.

 

Irrational beliefs (Ib's). Result in intense negative emotions. So, at Ib Mike is probably telling himself something like, "All atheists are murderers, I've had extremely negative experiences with people who claim atheism. I can't stand  his claims of atheism. It's awful, terrible and horrible that someone I care about claims atheism. I can't stand it. Fjuri must give up the label of atheism." These are the statements in his belief system which are probably causing him  to feel  very uncomfortable and lash out at me.

 

What can I do to help him? First, I better make sure that I don't have Ib's about Mike's providing me with an A (activating event--his seeming hostility towards  me and my atheism. Mike's thinking produces Mike's emotions just like my thinking produces my emotions. It's important that I always remember that. That way I will feel not feel so  frustrated at C (emotional consequence) and not want to give up on our friendship.

 

On the other hand maybe his friendship is not worth it. Maybe he will always be obsessed with  my atheism. I'll go along for a while to see if I need to make a decision to perhaps end our  relationship. On the other hand, I could consider his request? Perhaps he is not being unreasonable in his request that I take a softer view towards the existence of other beings? He might just be right about that? I certainly don't want him to think that I am a murderer. I don't want him to think that I think he or others shouldn't exist. I guess I will have to assess how much my atheism label really means to me? Is the response that I am getting from others really worth the maintenance of this label? Will I still be a complete human being without it? There is a compromise that he has suggested.

 

And yet I have a right to claim atheism. I do it all the time. True, Mike has tried to show me that it's not all about only one person in a relationship but, my atheism is very important to me.

 

Note; these are questions that the rest of your belief system can help you answer. You can do an analysis of probable outcomes (commonly called reasoning) by using your mind's software's predictive ability. This is usually  an "if, then" function. For example, if I give up believing I am an atheist, does it mean that I will lose respect for myself? Or, what will happen if I help  convince Mike that my atheism is no threat to him?  He seems to think it is.

 

These kinds of "if, then" statements (cause effext scenarios) are the essence of our reasoning ability. One may say, "if I do this, what is the most likely result?" We then answer our own question, You can run a number of these "if, then" scenarios to help you mediate a decision on what your behavior or response to an external or internal stimuli  will be.

 

Now I would like to introduce D which stands for disputation of irrational beliefs (DIB's). In this step we question our irrational beliefs and dispute them. We replace Ib's with rational beliefs. For example, "it's not horrible terrible or awful only inconvenient. No amount of inconvenience amounts to a horror!"

 

And now there is E. E is the new effect we get from disputing our Ib's. E always results in appropriate concern and appropriate emotions which then can lead to problem solving behaviors.

 

Note that we do not have to dispute Rb's.



#43 Fjuri

Fjuri

    Veteran Member

  • Veteran Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,891 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Age: 31
  • no affiliation
  • Atheist
  • Belgium

Posted 24 November 2013 - 04:16 AM

Sigh, it is indeed those irrational beliefs that I try to handle. By showing behavior, not adressing them directly. Not by going into a "you vs me" attitude you seem to wish to impose at every turn.



#44 Mike Summers

Mike Summers

    Veteran Member

  • Veteran Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 3,510 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:Information theory, electronics, videography, writing, human psychology, psychotherapy
  • Age: 61
  • Christian
  • Creationist
  • Detroit Michigan area

Posted 24 November 2013 - 06:28 AM

A Poem  by L Hughes

 

 

When you  turn the corner

And run into Yourself

Then you know

You have turned

All the corners

That  are left.



#45 Fjuri

Fjuri

    Veteran Member

  • Veteran Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,891 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Age: 31
  • no affiliation
  • Atheist
  • Belgium

Posted 24 November 2013 - 06:54 AM

I think the experiment is over. I wish you all the best!



#46 Adam Nagy

Adam Nagy

    Honorable Member

  • Veteran Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 7,053 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Age: 37
  • Christian
  • Young Earth Creationist
  • Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Posted 24 November 2013 - 07:43 AM


I think the experiment is over. I wish you all the best!

Fjuri, it's been good having you here. You are welcome here any time. Your posts will stand as a demonstration from what kind of thoughtful conduct we expect for oppositional views to ours. Thank you!

#47 Mike Summers

Mike Summers

    Veteran Member

  • Veteran Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 3,510 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:Information theory, electronics, videography, writing, human psychology, psychotherapy
  • Age: 61
  • Christian
  • Creationist
  • Detroit Michigan area

Posted 28 November 2013 - 09:52 AM

conclusions drawn from experiment.

 

I have noticed over the years that whenever one's internal view of the world conflicts with their external view of the world (external reality), there will be emotional disturbance and poor behavior as a result.  The stronger the belief, the greater the disturbance and resultant poor behavior.

 

 

If the therapist (which is the role that those of us that defend our faith are playing) uses logic, paradoxical intention (humor and satire) or appears to become even more demanding than the beings we are reasoning with, we may help them create a less  demanding dysfunctional view of their external world. But as we observe, based on the pristine logic of, Adam, Deskudd, Fred, Gilbo, Ikester, Ron, Salsa and others, we often are unable to convince our would be opponents of the defects in their beliefs. They can and often will frustrate themselves over their wrong conclusion that we have caused them to be frustrated. So we get the blame for their dysfunction--a wrong diagnosis.

 

I think most of us are cool with that. What someone thinks in the privacy of their mind has no effect on what we think in the privacy of our mind. Our thoughts produce our our emotions just as their thoughts produce theirs I work very hard to make my internal reality the  same view as external reality. I have hopes that eventually others can and will do the same. I am not, however, of the belief that anyone has to do that.

 

As Adam  (of biblical fame) blamed Eve for what he chose to do, so our errant brothers will do the same for us. We are not taught the cause of our emotions. We tend to believe external stimuli instead of the goodness or evilness we attribute to these experiences causes us to emote. To this end, we may hear statements like "She made me angry." Or, "That really upset me." Typically we will hear expressions like, "Christians are so fanatically religious. Religion is the problem. Religion is blamed as  if it  is an entity and those that do so do not seem to understand that if evolution is the only game in town, it has to be responsible for all the neurotic and psychotic interactions among people. Mutations cause all our problems and natural selection, will eventually sort it out.

 

We are trying to get our alleged atheist friends to adopt a less demanding view of their external world. We would do well to keep in mind that we could fall prey to the same demands they place upon themselves. I think most of us do a pretty good job of not doing that in that we acknowledge their excuse, deception. As Jesus said, "Father forgive them, for they know not what they do." That's their excuse but, it can't be ours.

 

Atheism is a symptom of a demanding view. Unfortunately, and all too often, this demanding view will be used in other areas of their life. They will cause undue conflict with people that hold similar demanding views. Those that they are closest to often bear the brunt of their demanding views.

 

On the surface, we appear to be just as demanding as they are. It is easy for them to draw that conclusion. They can think of us as unreasonable. My mom used to say, The cuckoo calls himself by his own name. This may help us understand them better but, it's a  glib answer to them.

 

I can assure you in my case, I have no doubt that things are exactly the way they are. Moreover, that's the way they should be. There is no such thing as fair, and anyone that holds that view is denying external reality. There simply is no agreement among the people on planet earth as to what fair actually is. As it says at the end of the book of Kings II, "There was no King in Israel in those days and everyone did what was right in their own eyes."

 

God gives us  the answer to  our dilemma. However, free moral agency allows anyone that wants to to override it. The Scripture says, "There is a way that seems right to a man but, the ends thereof are the ways of death." Furthermore, the Scripture says, "Come let us reason together..." But as we know, once again, people can override reality.

 

This experiment was an attempt to influence others to adopt a less demanding view of their external world. The result of this experiment hopefully will help the lurkers, and others that will read and ponder the experiment. The answer to the alleged atheist is to accept agnosticism--a less demanding view. The answer for the Christian is to accept obnoxious reality. As the Scripture says, "A soft answer turns away wrath."

 

 



#48 Fjuri

Fjuri

    Veteran Member

  • Veteran Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,891 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Age: 31
  • no affiliation
  • Atheist
  • Belgium

Posted 28 November 2013 - 12:45 PM

In respons to that assessment, I will just quote some book I read. Most of you must have read it, some of you seem to have forgotten about it:

 

25 On one occasion an expert in the law stood up to test Jesus. “Teacher,” he asked, “what must I do to inherit eternal life?”

26 “What is written in the Law?” he replied. “How do you read it?”

27 He answered, “‘Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your strength and with all your mind’[a]; and, ‘Love your neighbor as yourself.’[b]

28 “You have answered correctly,” Jesus replied. “Do this and you will live.”

29 But he wanted to justify himself, so he asked Jesus, “And who is my neighbor?”

30 In reply Jesus said: “A man was going down from Jerusalem to Jericho, when he was attacked by robbers. They stripped him of his clothes, beat him and went away, leaving him half dead. 31 A priest happened to be going down the same road, and when he saw the man, he passed by on the other side. 32 So too, a Levite, when he came to the place and saw him, passed by on the other side. 33 But a Samaritan, as he traveled, came where the man was; and when he saw him, he took pity on him. 34 He went to him and bandaged his wounds, pouring on oil and wine. Then he put the man on his own donkey, brought him to an inn and took care of him. 35 The next day he took out two denarii[c] and gave them to the innkeeper. ‘Look after him,’ he said, ‘and when I return, I will reimburse you for any extra expense you may have.’

36 “Which of these three do you think was a neighbor to the man who fell into the hands of robbers?”

37 The expert in the law replied, “The one who had mercy on him.”

Jesus told him, “Go and do likewise.”

 

Of course if you keep to alleged christianity, you don't have to worry about any of it.



#49 Mike Summers

Mike Summers

    Veteran Member

  • Veteran Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 3,510 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:Information theory, electronics, videography, writing, human psychology, psychotherapy
  • Age: 61
  • Christian
  • Creationist
  • Detroit Michigan area

Posted 29 November 2013 - 01:08 AM

Cheers Fjuri

Could you explain the last sentence--not the "alleged Christianity" comment but the latter part of that sentence is not real clear. I.e. "you don't have to worry about any of it."  Worry about the any  of what?. Tanks smile.png



#50 Fjuri

Fjuri

    Veteran Member

  • Veteran Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,891 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Age: 31
  • no affiliation
  • Atheist
  • Belgium

Posted 29 November 2013 - 03:50 AM

Don't worry about any of the stories written in the bible.



#51 Mike Summers

Mike Summers

    Veteran Member

  • Veteran Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 3,510 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:Information theory, electronics, videography, writing, human psychology, psychotherapy
  • Age: 61
  • Christian
  • Creationist
  • Detroit Michigan area

Posted 29 November 2013 - 11:11 PM

Don't worry about any of the stories written in the bible.

I totally agree.  What will it matter three hundred years from now?



#52 Fjuri

Fjuri

    Veteran Member

  • Veteran Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,891 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Age: 31
  • no affiliation
  • Atheist
  • Belgium

Posted 19 December 2013 - 12:53 PM

I'm curious, why didn't you adopt the agnostic label and picked the Christian Agnostic label instead?



#53 Mike Summers

Mike Summers

    Veteran Member

  • Veteran Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 3,510 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:Information theory, electronics, videography, writing, human psychology, psychotherapy
  • Age: 61
  • Christian
  • Creationist
  • Detroit Michigan area

Posted 22 December 2013 - 08:40 AM

I'm curious, why didn't you adopt the agnostic label and picked the Christian Agnostic label instead?

I am working on an answer for you but since I am older, I have a slower CPU. lol  :)



#54 Fjuri

Fjuri

    Veteran Member

  • Veteran Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,891 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Age: 31
  • no affiliation
  • Atheist
  • Belgium

Posted 23 December 2013 - 09:06 AM

Sure, take your time.



#55 Mike Summers

Mike Summers

    Veteran Member

  • Veteran Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 3,510 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:Information theory, electronics, videography, writing, human psychology, psychotherapy
  • Age: 61
  • Christian
  • Creationist
  • Detroit Michigan area

Posted 28 December 2013 - 02:51 PM

The best way to hate someone is to teach them to hate themselves. I know you don't think you're doing that but let's revisit my Mickey Mouse example

Most people realize that Mickey Mouse does not exist as a self animating being. Similarly some people believe there is no God. Why is it that we don't find people protesting the existence of Mickey Mouse? Why are there no Amickey Mousists? Why the bias?

All of us are capable of creating things. But what happens if one or both of us are tricked into un-creating what the other has created? As an example, suppose two children are playing on the beach. One child has spent half a day building a Sandcastle. Another child has been frolicking in the water for half a day. That child comes over to the Sandcastle and destroys it. When asked what his excuse was he said, "It ts not a real castle. I don't believe in Sandcastles." A logical conclusion from not believing that Sandcastle's  is to destroy it when it is brought into existence.

We are creators. What that means is the things that we think and bring into existence require no causational  evidence. Our creative ability is its first cause. Without a first cause of the telephone there would be no telephones. The creative act by definition is the ability to bring something into existence that did not exist before.

There are many things we know that were created by intelligence. Once again I wish to emphasize that there is no evidence for a creative act. Before something was created it didn't exist. However, that's not to say that it was not possible to bring it into existence.

Maybe 1000 years or so ago if you said the telephone was not possible, you would get a lot of believers. I doubt if you would get that many non-believers today?

 

As you know atheism is a negative. It's the belief that one specific being cannot exist. Yet, on planet Earth there are 7 billion beings who are allegedly made in the image of God. If they exist, how can "the original being" not be able to exist? If we take a picture of something, does that mean that what we photograph never existed? To say that something can't exist denies the existence of everything that does exist. For something not to exist it has to be possible to exist.

If we observe our thinking--our reasoning ability, we will realize that existence is possible. So if you wish to view it as a dichotomy, then nonexistence is not possible because bringing something into existence is possible. This may be viewed as a paradox. Do paradoxes exist? Yes. Here's an example of one; "Please Do Not Read This Sign." In order to honor the sign's request we have to do what it asked us not to do.

My argument from the beginning was that you don't know what can or cannot exist. The primary reason for that is that you are not omnipotent. Like me you are a finite source of information. I create the possibility of God. In your mind to be "equal" with me you "seem"  to claim that what I create can't exist. I agree that I can't create God. That's my compromise. You continue to argue that there is no God. As I have said numerous times, a compromise would be to say that you don't know whether there is a God are not. If you can'tcrete God, you certainly can not uncreate Him.

What's going on here? It appears to me that you are overriding my creativity. You are showing me that you are just as creative as me. That's something that I agree with. I do not believe I can out create you. I am sure that if you continue to want to hold on to your belief that non0existence of unique beings is possible, you will create what you think is a plausible answer to this post.

As I have said before, you have the ability and the right to create anything you wish to. However, in my opinion, there are some things, in order to promote relationships with others, that it's best not to create. Two of those things to me are what has to exist and what can not exist.

Ultimately, all of us exist because we exist. We do not have to exist. Since we do exist, it would seem ridiculous to believe that we don't or can't exist. :)



#56 Fjuri

Fjuri

    Veteran Member

  • Veteran Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,891 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Age: 31
  • no affiliation
  • Atheist
  • Belgium

Posted 29 December 2013 - 09:00 AM

The best way to hate someone is to teach them to hate themselves. I know you don't think you're doing that but let's revisit my Mickey Mouse example

So you are telling me I am teaching you to hate yourself? How am I doing that, by acting normally?

Aren't you teaching yourself to hate yourself? I would ask you to stop that, there is no reason for it. There is nothing you have done, even when being dishonest, that would constitute hate. Maybe some things you have done outside these boards, but even there I don't think there is much to be hateful about yourself about. You may have made some mistakes, so have I and everyone else. If you see actions you regret, you can change them in the future. Don't fixate on the negative, about the people you have (unintentially) wronged, but learn from your mistakes and move on. The bible itself has some nice stories about forgiveness, I bet you will find strength in there.

 

All of us are capable of creating things. But what happens if one or both of us are tricked into un-creating what the other has created? As an example, suppose two children are playing on the beach. One child has spent half a day building a Sandcastle. Another child has been frolicking in the water for half a day. That child comes over to the Sandcastle and destroys it. When asked what his excuse was he said, "It ts not a real castle. I don't believe in Sandcastles." A logical conclusion from not believing that Sandcastle's  is to destroy it when it is brought into existence.

No, the logical conclusion when not believing in sandcastles and meeting one would be one of the following (it is actually a process, where each of the phases can be of different length and impact):

1- denial

2- anger

3- bargaining

4- depression

5- acceptance

You should not think that everyone will get stuck in the second stage, anger, and let alone act upon it by destroying the castle.

 

As you know atheism is a negative.

Nope, I will answer this further in the why atheism is a religion thread later. But I don't know that.

 

It's the belief that one specific being cannot exist. Yet, on planet Earth there are 7 billion beings who are allegedly made in the image of God. If they exist, how can "the original being" not be able to exist? If we take a picture of something, does that mean that what we photograph never existed? To say that something can't exist denies the existence of everything that does exist. For something not to exist it has to be possible to exist.

I don't think there are 7 billion beings who are allegedly made in the image of God. If I were to accept that, I would of course have to accept God's existence, but I don't.

 

The question remains:

Why didn't you adopt the agnostic label and picked the Christian Agnostic label instead? Or did I miss it in your text?



#57 Mike Summers

Mike Summers

    Veteran Member

  • Veteran Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 3,510 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:Information theory, electronics, videography, writing, human psychology, psychotherapy
  • Age: 61
  • Christian
  • Creationist
  • Detroit Michigan area

Posted 29 December 2013 - 10:05 AM

Aren't you teaching yourself to hate yourself? I would ask you to stop that, there is no reason for it. There is nothing you have done, even when being dishonest, that would constitute hate. Maybe some things you have done outside these boards, but even there I don't think there is much to be hateful about yourself about. You may have made some mistakes, so have I and everyone else. If you see actions you regret, you can change them in the future. Don't fixate on the negative, about the people you have (unintentially) wronged, but learn from your mistakes and move on. The bible itself has some nice stories about forgiveness, I bet you will find strength in there.

Believe it or not I agree with you. Normally I would answer you from the alleged atheism point of view that evolution caused me to be the way I am. You seem to pick and choose. Sometimes you believe evolution did it and sometimes you believe you can act "above" evolution.

['quote]
, the logical conclusion when not believing in sandcastles and meeting one would be one of the following (it is actually a process, where each of the phases can be of different length and impact):
1- denial
2- anger
3- bargaining
4- depression
5- acceptance
You should not think that everyone will get stuck in the second stage, anger, and let alone act upon it by destroying the castle.

[/quote]


Good reasoning. But, I usually skip the first four.
In my story the boy destroyed the Sandcastle. He is a different being from you and me. Obviously the boy acted on his anger. I agree with your reasoning process. However this little boy did not use that process because he is not you nor me. Since what he did is a reality, your analysis is after-the-fact. As I have said before behavior is always indicative of one's thinking. It was perfectly logical rom his point of view to do what he did. Do you disagree?.

I don't think there are 7 billion beings who are allegedly made in the image of God. If I were to accept that, I would of course have to accept God's existence, but I don't.

Well, this answer is what I would expect. You are right. I claimed that are 7 billion people on the planet allegedly made in the image of God. Maybe this is a language problem? Are you saying you don't think that we humans have a lot of similarities?

Your acceptance or denial of God has nothing to do whether that exist are not. Once again I must reassert that you are not omnipotent. For example you do not know who lives on a planet in Andromeda galaxy or the rest of the universe either. Not even my existence is based on whether you believe I exist or not. That's why keep trying to point out to you by your conclusion that there is no God is not valid. At best you can say, you don't know one way or the other. As our great statesmen once said, "convinced against your will of the same opinion still." So you are willing yourself not to believe the truth. I guess that's evolution work.

I would think that a true evolutionist would believe that evolution is responsible for everything. To me you seem to pick and choose what you want to believe in what you don't want to believe. That seems incongruent to me. Isn't evolution responsible for everything? Most materialist argue that there is no such thing as free choice. Do you differ from that?



#58 Fjuri

Fjuri

    Veteran Member

  • Veteran Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,891 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Age: 31
  • no affiliation
  • Atheist
  • Belgium

Posted 29 December 2013 - 11:13 AM

Well, this answer is what I would expect. You are right. I claimed that are 7 billion people on the planet allegedly made in the image of God. Maybe this is a language problem? Are you saying you don't think that we humans have a lot of similarities?

There is a difference between "similarities in humans" and "in the image of God" imho.

 

I would think that a true evolutionist would believe that evolution is responsible for everything. To me you seem to pick and choose what you want to believe in what you don't want to believe. That seems incongruent to me. Isn't evolution responsible for everything?

Why would evolution be responsible for everything? Evolution has a descriptive function.

 

Most materialist argue that there is no such thing as free choice.

I think free choice or the illusion of free choice is close enough.

 

Your acceptance or denial of God has nothing to do whether that exist are not. Once again I must reassert that you are not omnipotent. For example you do not know who lives on a planet in Andromeda galaxy or the rest of the universe either. Not even my existence is based on whether you believe I exist or not. That's why keep trying to point out to you by your conclusion that there is no God is not valid. At best you can say, you don't know one way or the other. As our great statesmen once said, "convinced against your will of the same opinion still." So you are willing yourself not to believe the truth. I guess that's evolution work.

Why are you invoking evolution when you are talking about atheism? What has evolution to do with it?



#59 Mike Summers

Mike Summers

    Veteran Member

  • Veteran Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 3,510 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:Information theory, electronics, videography, writing, human psychology, psychotherapy
  • Age: 61
  • Christian
  • Creationist
  • Detroit Michigan area

Posted 01 January 2014 - 12:54 PM

A human being created the idea of no God (atheism). Evolution was createD by a human to explain the orIgin of us, plants and animals without a creator. Atheism and evolution are closely related. It's kind of hard I would imagine to divorce yourself from the process that allegedly caued you I would imagine.

 

I have a question which you do not have to answer, In one of your posts you said you asked a minister to get married in a "Christian" church.  What were you thinking? I told myself that probably your fiancé wanted a church wedding?



#60 Fjuri

Fjuri

    Veteran Member

  • Veteran Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,891 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Age: 31
  • no affiliation
  • Atheist
  • Belgium

Posted 02 January 2014 - 01:46 AM

I think a human being also created the idea of a God (theism).

 

I belief we are part of evolution. Any action we take will affect the future (for most actions in a very small way). I understand evolution as nothing more then statistical observation (combined with some biological mechanics). Statistics I do understand. As with all statistics, the global outcome is unable to say anything about an individual's goals or actions. So I feel no need to 'enforce' or 'fight' evolution because of it.

 

While the individual man is an insoluble puzzle, in the aggregate he becomes a mathematical certainty. You can, for example, never foretell what any one man will be up to, but you can say with precision what an average number will be up to. Individuals vary, but percentages remain constant. So says the statistician.

- Sir A. C. Doyle

 

Did you suddenly become a republican when Bush was elected, or a democrat when Obama got elected? You didn't change because of what happened, and nor do I because I belief a process is true.

 

A lot of my morals and values coincide with those of the catholic church. It will also be easier to teach these to my children (when I have them) when making use of an established setting.

 

I do not have a belief in a creator God. The minister is aware of this.






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users