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Problem I - Cratering. 2. The Earth


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#561 piasan

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Posted 27 July 2016 - 04:05 AM

Very simple question for you Pi...if you could prove that the kind of object that would make a 100 mile crater on the Moon would penetrate to 2 bars on Jupiter or on Earth, why is that not just 33 feet under the ocean? That would indeed make a large splash, but no crater...regardless of what the effects site says. This should be easily answered so I hope you don't take too long.

I guess you're trying to claim if the SL-9 model showed penetration to two bars, it wouldn't do any damage.  The problem is that model shows the distribution of energy release.  It would peak at 2 bars... but about half f the energy would remain. 

 

Hitting the water at 35 m/sec is like hitting concrete .... what do you think hitting it at 17,000 m/sec would be like?



#562 piasan

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Posted 27 July 2016 - 04:15 AM

If a 100mi diameter cloud of water molecules and rocky stuff with an average density of .01 were to impact the Moon at 17km/s, which is the correct answer?:

 

1.  No crater at all would form

2.  A 100mi diameter or larger would form.

3.  A crater smaller than 100 mi diameter would form.. 

4.  None of the above.

 

The result will be a field of smaller craters.

 

If you change that density to .001, what would the answers be? 

A less concentrated field of small craters.

 

Please note that Brown has not stated what the original density of the proto-asteroids were.  He has only said they started very low-density and then were consolidated by gravity and moved outward so that they are their present densities at their present distances. 

I'll be happy to discuss Brown-type objects in the new topic.






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