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Is The Cell Inntelligent?


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#1 Mike Summers

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Posted 30 July 2016 - 02:14 PM

Is the cell Intelligent?

Most of us believe what we are taught. We are taught that DNA code stores information. I read somewhere that identical code can "code" for entirely different features in plants and animals.

Speaking of the function of code in the huma mental state, it takes code, coupled with an antecedant intelligent learning process to read the code I have typed on this page.
Our metal state needs to be aware that the same code unit can have enitirely different meaning based on what we call context.

Consider the following code generated by:

"Lots of people want to ride with you in the limo, but what you want is someone who will take the bus with you when the limo breaks down." –- Oprah Winfrey

An older adult reading this quote would realize that it means more then a literal interpretation (interpretation requires a mental function). According to the Oxford dictionary, the word "set" has 396 meanings. To place in a position, to perform several physical exercies and then pause, a TV set, musicians performing sevals songs, to adust the time on a clock, to harden into a solid state as with gelatin or concrete, a mathematical function (set and subset), etc.

At some point the individual's cells that make up our body's 78 organs have to be "aware" of which cells tpe they are and what to do when code is sent to them via the nervous system from our brain.

Is intelligence necessary for a cell to function? Is the cell, concious and intelligent?



#2 aelyn

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Posted 30 July 2016 - 04:32 PM

At some point the individual's cells that make up our body's 78 organs have to be "aware" of which cells tpe they are and what to do when code is sent to them via the nervous system from our brain.

Is intelligence necessary for a cell to function? Is the cell, concious and intelligent?

 

 

You can't answer this question without going deeper into what you mean by "conscious" and "intelligent", given both of those words have varied meanings depending on context, and those meanings are often vague with not so much definitions as "I know it when I see it (but do you though)". Then again one can see the entire point of the question of being about what we mean by consciousness and intelligence, and the cell being just a vehicle for those questions.

 

 

Does the ability to react in specific ways to specific stimuli require intelligence ? There are certain definitions of "intelligence" that are that broad, and by those definitions pretty much all living things, and a whole lot of non-living ones are intelligent. But that's not the definition we use when we talk about "intelligence" as being something humans are much more than others. If we do think however that the ability to react in specific ways to specific stimuli involves intelligence and consciousness *like ours*, then the question becomes: are there things that *aren't* intelligent ?

 

 

Other question: should we distinguish an entity's own intelligence or consciousness from intelligence or consciousness having been involved in the process that created it ? For example, is a computer conscious and intelligent ? It certainly reacts to complex codes in very specific ways. Most people thinking of intelligence and consciousness in a colloquial way wouldn't say computers are intelligent, let alone conscious however. They might say that while computers *behave* in intelligent and sometimes conscious-like ways, that is because they were designed to behave that way by actually intelligent and conscious entities - humans. Creationists make the same argument for life in general - living things function the way they do because an intelligent God created them to do so. As a Creationist, would you argue that cells actually *are* conscious and intelligent, or do you instead think that cells behave in very specific, intelligent ways because they were designed to do so by a conscious intelligence, but aren't themselves conscious or intelligent ? Do you see a difference between those two things ?

 

 

For an example of how that might work, when you say that cells must be "aware" of what cell type they are, the same argument can be made of computers can't it ? Is a C compiler "aware" that it is a C compiler and not a Fortran compiler, or is it a C compiler by virtue of its composition and internal structure, which make it able to compile C but not compile Fortran ? And is it "aware" of the program it compiles into an executable, or does it respond to each line of code in the manner in which its composition and internal structure make inevitable (or highly likely, for less deterministic programs) ? Or are those two things the same thing, and if so is there anything we can say *isn't* aware ? Or is there a complexity limit so that a "Hello World" program isn't aware but the Google search engine is ?






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