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Pyramid Schemes

Organized Religion Pyramid Schemes

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#1 Fjuri

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Posted 23 March 2017 - 10:16 AM

In a pyramid scheme, an organization compels individuals who wish to join to make a payment. In exchange, the organization promises its new members a share of the money taken from every additional member that they recruit. The directors of the organization (those at the top of the pyramid) also receive a share of these payments. For the directors, the scheme is potentially lucrative—whether or not they do any work, the organization's membership has a strong incentive to continue recruiting and funneling money to the top of the pyramid.

Such organizations seldom involve sales of products or services with value. Without creating any goods or services, the only revenue streams for the scheme are recruiting more members, or soliciting more money from current members. The behavior of pyramid schemes follows the mathematics concerning exponential growth quite closely. Each level of the pyramid is much larger than the one before it. For a pyramid scheme to make money for everyone who enrolls in it, it would have to expand indefinitely. This is not possible because the population of Earth is finite. When the scheme inevitably runs out of new recruits, lacking other sources of revenue, it collapses. Because in a geometric series, the biggest terms are at the end, most people will be in the lower levels of the pyramid (and indeed the bottom level is always the biggest single layer).

In a pyramid scheme, people in the upper layers typically profit while people in the lower layers typically lose money. Since at any given time, most of the members in the scheme are at the bottom, most participants in a pyramid scheme will not make any money. In particular, when the scheme collapses, most members will be in the bottom layers and thus will not have any opportunity to profit from the scheme, yet they will have paid to join the scheme. Therefore, a pyramid scheme is characterized by a few people (including the creators of the scheme) making large amounts of money, while most who join the scheme lose money. For this reason, they are considered scams.

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In organized religion, an organization compels individuals who wish to join to make a payment, do works and spend their time. In exchange, the organization promises its members a potential reward in the afterlife, depending on the money supplied, or the amount of additional members that they recruit by proselityzing. The directors/priests of the organization (those at the top of the religion, pope etc) also receive a share of these "payments". For the priests, the scheme is potentially lucrative—whether or not they do any work, the organization's membership has a strong incentive to continue recruiting and funneling money to the top of the religion.

Such organizations seldom involve real world products or services with value. Without creating any goods or services, the only revenue streams for the scheme are recruiting more members, or soliciting more money from current members. The behavior of organized religion follows the mathematics concerning exponential growth quite closely. Each level of the religion is much larger than the one before it. For a religion to provide for everyone who enrolls in it, it would have to expand indefinitely. This is not possible because the population of Earth is finite. 

In an organized religion, people in the upper layers typically profit while people in the lower layers typically lose out. Since at any given time, most of the members in the scheme are at the bottom, most participants in a religion lose out. Therefore, an organized religion is characterized by a few people making large amounts of money (ever visited Rome?), while most who join the scheme lose out. Despite this, they are considered good.

 

Wake up people. 



#2 eddified

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Posted 23 March 2017 - 12:59 PM

There certainly are some people in religion that are in it for the money. http://www.cnn.com/2...ollar-jet-feat/

However, this is the generalization fallacy. Generalizations could be made about the evils of atheism. Your opinion regarding religion is wrong when applied to specific cases.




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