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If Evolution Is True, Why Are There So Many Creation Myths?


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#1 Dredge

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Posted 12 May 2017 - 03:36 AM

If creation is true, it would be reasonable to expect that ancient cultures would reflect this stupendously important event in their folklore - they do; lots of them. If evolution is true, how can all these creatiion stories be explained?

#2 mike the wiz

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Posted 12 May 2017 - 03:44 AM

The flood ones are the most impressive;

 

 

 

Wibble's favourite link: In fact, Flood stories which include the saving of only a few people and animals, are found in many cultures worldwide and provide fascinating circumstantial evidence that the common ancestor of Aborigines, Jews, and indeed all modern races of man was Noah.

http://creation.com/...l-flood-stories



#3 cheeseburger

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Posted 12 May 2017 - 07:14 AM

Perhaps embryonic creation and flood ideas spread before humans came out of Africa

#4 StormanNorman

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Posted 12 May 2017 - 07:30 AM

If creation is true, it would be reasonable to expect that ancient cultures would reflect this stupendously important event in their folklore - they do; lots of them. If evolution is true, how can all these creatiion stories be explained?

 

Maybe because for some there is just an inherent need to believe in a higher being and special creation; this would especially be true going back thousands of years before people really had any means of physically understanding the world and events around them.  It's certainly a happier, more comforting story than evolution.



#5 Blitzking

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Posted 12 May 2017 - 09:16 AM

If creation is true, it would be reasonable to expect that ancient cultures would reflect this stupendously important event in their folklore - they do; lots of them. If evolution is true, how can all these creatiion stories be explained?

 
Maybe because for some there is just an inherent need to believe in a higher being and special creation; this would especially be true going back thousands of years before people really had any means of physically understanding the world and events around them.  It's certainly a happier, more comforting story than evolution.


Dont you find it amazing how people already KNEW that God existed thousands of years before the invention of the microscope came along and PROVED IT..

#6 StormanNorman

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Posted 12 May 2017 - 09:23 AM

 

 

If creation is true, it would be reasonable to expect that ancient cultures would reflect this stupendously important event in their folklore - they do; lots of them. If evolution is true, how can all these creatiion stories be explained?

 
Maybe because for some there is just an inherent need to believe in a higher being and special creation; this would especially be true going back thousands of years before people really had any means of physically understanding the world and events around them.  It's certainly a happier, more comforting story than evolution.


Dont you find it amazing how people already KNEW that God existed thousands of years before....

 

 

Not really....no.  It's basically what I said in the post above.  Of course, there were many different gods that people worshiped; some like the Romans and Greeks worshiped many gods at the same time.  Again, I don't find that surprising at all; in fact, I think it's human nature.

 

 

.....the invention of the microscope came along and PROVED IT..

 

Proved it???



#7 Blitzking

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Posted 12 May 2017 - 10:38 PM

 

 

 

If creation is true, it would be reasonable to expect that ancient cultures would reflect this stupendously important event in their folklore - they do; lots of them. If evolution is true, how can all these creatiion stories be explained?

 
Maybe because for some there is just an inherent need to believe in a higher being and special creation; this would especially be true going back thousands of years before people really had any means of physically understanding the world and events around them.  It's certainly a happier, more comforting story than evolution.


Dont you find it amazing how people already KNEW that God existed thousands of years before....

 

 

Not really....no.  It's basically what I said in the post above.  Of course, there were many different gods that people worshiped; some like the Romans and Greeks worshiped many gods at the same time.  Again, I don't find that surprising at all; in fact, I think it's human nature.

 

 

.....the invention of the microscope came along and PROVED IT..

 

Proved it???

 

 

"Proved it???"

 

YUP

 

Accidentalists can no longer get away with the old Darwinian "I can imagine in some warm little pond" Lunacy,,, :think:

 

BECAUSE

 

Now (Thanks to SEMs) Man can "Check under the hood" so to speak... and Voila... Irrefutable Evidence for

a supernatural intelligence agent ...  AKA.... God...    :worship:      Yeah, its all there, Millions of lines of Specified

and Irreducibly Complex Genetic Information Encoded into Each and Every Self Replicating DNA molecule..

 

evolution.jpg


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#8 what if

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Posted 13 May 2017 - 05:35 AM

Perhaps embryonic creation and flood ideas spread before humans came out of Africa

interesting idea, but i've never seen fads such as this become global and persist for centuries.
can you name one, other than "religion" that is.
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#9 what if

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Posted 13 May 2017 - 06:22 AM

Not really....no.  It's basically what I said in the post above.  Of course, there were many different gods that people worshiped; some like the Romans and Greeks worshiped many gods at the same time.  Again, I don't find that surprising at all; in fact, I think it's human nature.

yes, i guess it could be called human nature.
have any idea why such a phenomenon would evolve?
on top of that, ever hear of the placebo effect?
why would a "faith based" phenomenon be woven right into the fabric of our being?
what's up with that?

#10 mike the wiz

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Posted 13 May 2017 - 08:12 AM

 

 

What If: why would a "faith based" phenomenon be woven right into the fabric of our being?

 

Don't fall into the trap of asking that, the answer will be the tautological one evolutionists always give; "beneficial for survival".

 

The problem with arguing that everything happened because it was selected for is that as evolutionists are arguing that everything is selected for and that's why it happened. (circular reasoning.)

 

Evolutionists argue that; "evolution would select the fittest. X feature is existent, therefore that is because it was the fittest, evolution chose for survival." But that doesn't really prove that the feature does exist for an evolution-caused reason, it only serves to automatically give the credit to evolution.

 

The problem with this reasoning is that it's tautological and circular because any feature we find, even if best described as being there because God made us in His image, is simply going to automatically be counted as, "had a survival advantage therefore was selected for."

 

I ate your dinner.

 

"you're that way because it is a survival advantage therefore was selected for. It is to preserve genes."

 

I gave you my dinner.

 

"you're that way because it is a survival advantage therefore was selected for. It is to preserve genes."

 

I called Goku Lady baba weed.

 

"you're that way because it is a survival advantage therefore was selected for. It is to preserve genes."

 

I insulted yo momma while eating baked beans standing on my head.

 

"you're that way because it is a survival advantage therefore was selected for. It is to preserve genes."

 

Think about it - if all of the evidence, no matter what it is, is automatically counted as evidence that evolution done it because of a survival advantage, then that is logically tantamount to saying; "all evidence, no matter what you find, automatically favours evolution even if it is the type of evidence you might expect if we were made in God's image."

 

Ermmm......that's just a bare assertion that evolution-did-it. Don't argue we say that God-did-it, and then replace it with evolution-did-it!



#11 what if

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Posted 13 May 2017 - 10:00 AM

What If: why would a "faith based" phenomenon be woven right into the fabric of our being?

 
Don't fall into the trap of asking that, the answer will be the tautological one evolutionists always give; "beneficial for survival".

that would be true if evolution worked the way evolutionists says it does.
unfortunately, natural selection has negligible effect on complexity, and the placebo effect is a highly complex phenomenon with the ability to alter the biomolecular makeup of the cell.

#12 mike the wiz

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Posted 13 May 2017 - 11:18 AM

 

 

What If: that would be true if evolution worked the way evolutionists says it does

 

Exunctly. It's just an "if", ...you can't just assign evolution as a cause, that is like me saying, "oh yeah sure, I've hired a new bodyguard, don't worry he's good enough for the job!"

 

"How do you know?"

 

"Because I say he's good enough."

 

"But how can I know?"

 

"You can't, I'm telling you he is so it's a fact that he is. based on me saying it."

 

"Have you ever met him or seen him?"

 

"Of course not. But everyone knows it's a fact."



#13 Dredge

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Posted 14 May 2017 - 02:35 AM

Perhaps embryonic creation and flood ideas spread before humans came out of Africa


Does the "Out of Africa" theory mean white people evolved from negroes?

#14 Goku

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Posted 14 May 2017 - 03:58 AM

 

Perhaps embryonic creation and flood ideas spread before humans came out of Africa


Does the "Out of Africa" theory mean white people evolved from negroes?

 

 

The biological theory of out of Africa does mean that we are all originally from Africa and thus white skinned people evolved from dark skinned people, yes, but your language, lol. I assume you don't know how racist that sounds in the 21st century.


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#15 Dredge

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Posted 16 May 2017 - 03:35 PM

Perhaps embryonic creation and flood ideas spread before humans came out of Africa


Does the "Out of Africa" theory mean white people evolved from negroes?
 
The biological theory of out of Africa does mean that we are all originally from Africa and thus white skinned people evolved from dark skinned people, yes, but your language, lol. I assume you don't know how racist that sounds in the 21st century.

I'm not a follower of the religion of Cultural Marxism, so I don't consider the word "negro" to be racist.  
Since the word is derived from the Latin word for "black", it is no more racist that calling a black man, "black", or a white man, "white".  If it was good enough for Martin Luther King to use "negro", then it's good enough for me.  
Let me guess, you consider "eskimo" to be a racist term as well;  and like any good neo-Marxist, you probably don't have a problem with white people sometimes being referred to as "white trash".

#16 Goku

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Posted 16 May 2017 - 08:06 PM

I'm not a follower of the religion of Cultural Marxism, so I don't consider the word "negro" to be racist.  

Since the word is derived from the Latin word for "black", it is no more racist that calling a black man, "black", or a white man, "white".  If it was good enough for Martin Luther King to use "negro", then it's good enough for me.  
Let me guess, you consider "eskimo" to be a racist term as well;  and like any good neo-Marxist, you probably don't have a problem with white people sometimes being referred to as "white trash".

 

I understand that negro is a neutral term and if you read scientific articles about race that is the word they use, but in my book if you are going to use negro for black people then you should use caucasian for white people; not white for white people while using negro for black people. Otherwise the optics is not ideal.

 

I found your post amusing; not insulting or offending, but as you will see below perhaps it is much more interesting than I originally thought.

 

I don't know what Cultural Marxism is, but I skimmed both normal Wiki and Rational Wiki. Since you don't seem like a politically correct person I will be terse: are you a white nationalist?



#17 Dredge

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 04:07 PM

 
I don't know what Cultural Marxism is, but I skimmed both normal Wiki and Rational Wiki. Since you don't seem like a politically correct person I will be terse: are you a white nationalist?


You don't have to know what a "cultural Marxist" is to be one - all you have to do is conform to the Zeitgeist of Western civilization.  

You're right, I'm definitely not politically correct.  Political correctness is a manifestation of cultural Marxism. 

I didn't know exactly what a "white nationalist" is, but having looked it up, I would say some of my views are consistent with "white nationalism".  But having said that, I have no truck with the anti-Semitic aspect of the Far Right, especially since I am part-Jewish. I also believe the Jews and the nation of Israel play very important roles in God's plan for humanity.  I have had friends of all races, but I believe there are "natural barriers" between the races that can't be ignored and will never be eradicated.

#18 Fjuri

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Posted 21 May 2017 - 02:16 AM

Perhaps embryonic creation and flood ideas spread before humans came out of Africa

Looking at the news nowadays it seems like floods aren't so uncommon.

Considering where humans tended to settle (near fresh water supplies) its not unlikely that local floods contributed to flood myths.

 

With regard to creation myths, I'm under the impression that "Goddidit" used to be a very common explanation. 

When I look at https://en.wikipedia..._creation_mythsonly a relatively small part have creation ex nihilo like the Abrahamic religions propose.



#19 Goku

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Posted 21 May 2017 - 08:46 PM

You don't have to know what a "cultural Marxist" is to be one - all you have to do is conform to the Zeitgeist of Western civilization.  


You're right, I'm definitely not politically correct.  Political correctness is a manifestation of cultural Marxism.

 

Yes, well, it is as it does.

 

And what do you see as the zeitgeist of the West?

 

I didn't know exactly what a "white nationalist" is, but having looked it up, I would say some of my views are consistent with "white nationalism".  But having said that, I have no truck with the anti-Semitic aspect of the Far Right, especially since I am part-Jewish. I also believe the Jews and the nation of Israel play very important roles in God's plan for humanity.  I have had friends of all races, but I believe there are "natural barriers" between the races that can't be ignored and will never be eradicated.

 

Apparently the role of the Jews within the white nationalist movement is being worked out. I don't know what is going on, but I suspect that many of the recent converts into such movements (they've been gaining popularity over the past decade or so) don't share the traditional view that Jews are evil people that need to be harmed for killing Jesus.

 

I find your last sentence to be the most interesting. I agree there are genetic and cultural differences between various races that have real world impacts, but I don't see any natural barriers between the races. I think most of the barriers we see between the races are cultural, not genetic, if I understand what you are saying.






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