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Where Does The Uniformatarian Sediment Come From?


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#1 KenJackson

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Posted 25 July 2017 - 07:58 AM

If I understand the uniformatarian point of view correctly, the deeper archeologists dig at a site, the further back in time they are going.  This must mean that new sediment is being added to the surface of the earth at a constent rate, year in and year out.

 

I'm skeptical about just how young the earth is.  But whatever the truth is, scientific observation should bear it out.  That's why I'm questioning the basics of uniformatarianism.

 

The problem is that there are now places on earth that I remember walking over 50 years ago.  In that time there doesn't seem to be any new sediment.  And I once found an abandoned graveyard in the woods with headstones that dated back almost 200 years.  The headstones seemed to be at the original level with no additional sediment.  The same was true of the poorly-maintained graveyard I visited in Connecticut that had headstones from the early 1700's.  Also, the rain constantly washes sediment into the rivers which carry it to the oceans.

 

I know all you YECers will say, yeah, that's proof.  But can anyone explain where true uniformatarians say the sediment comes from, and why I don't experience it?



#2 mike the wiz

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Posted 25 July 2017 - 01:06 PM

I presume the uniformists would say that buildings such as Roman buildings are now found deeper than they originally were. New mud accumulates and grows from sediments transported by winds, water and glaciers according to uniformitists. This is then slowly compacted into mostly shale presumably, since most of the rocks seem to be made from it from the mud. It's presumably too slow to see any real effects within 200 years. 

 

So perhaps that would be their answer.

 

Of course flume experiments have shown that laminated sedimentation can happen quickly under hydraulic conditions. We know many things we see in nature can be shown to be created when a catastrophe occurs. When Mt St Helens blew it's lid, it created many features we see in rocks. Laminae, different types of rock morphology, it also cut out a "mini grand canyon" 1/40th the size of the real thing in days. The rocks also shown chaffing uniformists previously thought happened because of other reasons. So basically a whole lot of features can be seen to come about quickly when there is a catastrophe. It makes great sense that a mega-catastrophe like the world scale flood, would simply create the same things only on a world-scale.



#3 Gneiss girl

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Posted 25 July 2017 - 06:14 PM

If I understand the uniformatarian point of view correctly, the deeper archeologists dig at a site, the further back in time they are going.  This must mean that new sediment is being added to the surface of the earth at a constent rate, year in and year out.

 

I'm skeptical about just how young the earth is.  But whatever the truth is, scientific observation should bear it out.  That's why I'm questioning the basics of uniformatarianism.

 

The problem is that there are now places on earth that I remember walking over 50 years ago.  In that time there doesn't seem to be any new sediment.  And I once found an abandoned graveyard in the woods with headstones that dated back almost 200 years.  The headstones seemed to be at the original level with no additional sediment.  The same was true of the poorly-maintained graveyard I visited in Connecticut that had headstones from the early 1700's.  Also, the rain constantly washes sediment into the rivers which carry it to the oceans.

 

I know all you YECers will say, yeah, that's proof.  But can anyone explain where true uniformatarians say the sediment comes from, and why I don't experience it?

 

I think you have a misconception of what uniformatarianism would suggest regarding geology and sedimentalogy. Basically, it is more about rates than location. It would predict that rates of sedimentation would average out to be relatively constant. And then these estimates of rates could be extrapolated to conclusions about how much geologic time may have elapsed. But this does not necessarily apply to location. We know that the Earth has a great deal of variation in its topography. Simply said, basins accumulate sediment, ranges or high locations loose sediment. This results in unconformities, which are common in the geologic record. They represent gaps in the geologic record where erosion has taken place instead of sediment accumulations. And of course, uniformatarianism can not be assumed to be true either. Rare and catastrophic events can and do lead to dramatically different sedimentation rates.


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#4 KenJackson

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Posted 25 July 2017 - 06:31 PM

Simply said, basins accumulate sediment, ranges or high locations loose sediment. This results in unconformities, which are common in the geologic record. They represent gaps in the geologic record where erosion has taken place instead of sediment accumulations.


I've never heard an evolutionist express anything but supreme confidence in the geologic column. Fossils can be fairly accurately dated by what layer they're found in, or so we're told. I want to know where the sediment came from to form those layers, and why I don't see the effect today.

#5 Gneiss girl

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Posted 25 July 2017 - 08:32 PM

 

Simply said, basins accumulate sediment, ranges or high locations loose sediment. This results in unconformities, which are common in the geologic record. They represent gaps in the geologic record where erosion has taken place instead of sediment accumulations.


I've never heard an evolutionist express anything but supreme confidence in the geologic column. Fossils can be fairly accurately dated by what layer they're found in, or so we're told. I want to know where the sediment came from to form those layers, and why I don't see the effect today.

 

This is my field. I'm sorry if you have the impression that there is supreme confidence in the geologic column. Don't be misled about the "accuracy" of fossil dating.

 

As far as where the sediment comes from, it depends. There are marine deposited sediments, non-marine sediments, aeolian sediments, etc. 






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