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In The Beginning, God ...


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#1 Dave

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Posted 22 February 2009 - 06:10 PM

We're all familiar with the opening verse of the Bible.

"In the beginning, God created the Heavens and the Earth."

Many Bible scholars are quoted as saying that if we understand and believe these 10 (in the KJV) words all the rest of God's word will make sense to us. Conversely, Chuck Missler, my favorite Bible teacher, says that if you have a problem with those 10 words, you'll have a problem with the rest of the Bible, and you'll have worse problems than just not understanding scripture.

He's also stated that many of the heterodox and unorthodox theological misunderstandings occur as a result of either inadvertent or willful misinterpretation of these first 10 words.

In view of the recent discussion in another thread about whether God exists outside of time, I'm particularly interested in parsing the first three words, "In the beginning ..."

What was God trying to tell us when He inspired the penning of those words? What is He saying about Himself? About time?

Dave

#2 Ron

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Posted 04 July 2009 - 02:52 PM

We're all familiar with the opening verse of the Bible.

"In the beginning, God created the Heavens and the Earth."

Many Bible scholars are quoted as saying that if we understand and believe these 10 (in the KJV) words all the rest of God's word will make sense to us. Conversely, Chuck Missler, my favorite Bible teacher, says that if you have a problem with those 10 words, you'll have a problem with the rest of the Bible, and you'll have worse problems than just not understanding scripture.

He's also stated that many of the heterodox and unorthodox theological misunderstandings occur as a result of either inadvertent or willful misinterpretation of these first 10 words.

In view of the recent discussion in another thread about whether God exists outside of time, I'm particularly interested in parsing the first three words, "In the beginning ..."

What was God trying to tell us when He inspired the penning of those words? What is He saying about Himself? About time?

Dave

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Hello Dave :huh:

The answer to your question is dependent upon your worldview and whether or not you are a Biblical literalist or liberal in your interpretation (or interpolation) of God’s Word.

Chuck Missler is one of my favorite Biblical expositors as well. So, we are most likely like minded in the answer to this question and I’ll wait until some others weigh in on this question.

#3 Teo

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Posted 22 July 2009 - 12:11 PM

I heard someone (don't remember who, I think Kent H*vind) giving a nice explanation to this verse.
In the beginning = time
God created the heaven = space
and the earth. = matter

In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth. = time, space, matter = trinity

time is past, present, future
Time = Trinity

space is length, width, height
Space = Trinity

matter is solid, liquid, gas
Matter = Trinity

Genesis 1:1 is a trinity of trinities.

#4 AFJ

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Posted 31 August 2009 - 06:43 PM

We're all familiar with the opening verse of the Bible.

"In the beginning, God created the Heavens and the Earth."

Many Bible scholars are quoted as saying that if we understand and believe these 10 (in the KJV) words all the rest of God's word will make sense to us. Conversely, Chuck Missler, my favorite Bible teacher, says that if you have a problem with those 10 words, you'll have a problem with the rest of the Bible, and you'll have worse problems than just not understanding scripture.

He's also stated that many of the heterodox and unorthodox theological misunderstandings occur as a result of either inadvertent or willful misinterpretation of these first 10 words.

In view of the recent discussion in another thread about whether God exists outside of time, I'm particularly interested in parsing the first three words, "In the beginning ..."

What was God trying to tell us when He inspired the penning of those words? What is He saying about Himself? About time?

Dave

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In the beginning of this age--our current earth. That's how I see it anyway. God does not reveal to us what happened before the creation.

Used to lean slightly (for lack of another explanation in my mind at that time) towards the gap theory that teaches two floods-- the first flood destroyed the earth which Lucifer was over and was afterward destroyed when he fell (scriptural interpretation concerning these things in Isaiah and in 2 Peter--off the top of my head). But afterward I learned there was evidence for a young earth.

Anyway, I also agree that God is outside of time. Jesus said "before Abraham was I am." God was "I am" with Moses also. States His unchanging and eternal existence. Eternity like infinity goes both directions.

This is why the atheist question "Who created God" is humanistic and though done in ignorance, arrogant. Because it makes no effort of thought i.e. if someone was all-powerful enough to create all things then there is a good probability they are past our human understanding.

#5 the totton linnet

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Posted 01 September 2009 - 03:17 AM

In the beginning of this age--our current earth.  That's how I see it anyway.   God does not reveal to us what happened before the creation. 

Used to lean slightly (for lack of another explanation in my mind at that time) towards the gap theory that teaches two floods-- the first flood destroyed the earth which Lucifer was over and was afterward destroyed when he fell (scriptural interpretation concerning these things in Isaiah and in 2 Peter--off the top of my head).   But afterward I learned there was evidence for a young earth.

Anyway, I also agree that God is outside of time.  Jesus said "before Abraham was I am."  God was "I am" with Moses also.  States His unchanging and eternal existence. Eternity like infinity goes both directions.

This is why the atheist question "Who created God" is humanistic and though done in ignorance, arrogant.  Because it makes no effort of thought i.e. if someone was all-powerful enough to create all things then there is a good probability they are past our human understanding.

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*
I wonder if I can plant a seed, a seed is a very precious thing if it is God word, when it is planted in our hearts it begins to agitate and grow just like a natural seed in soil.
God is [so far as I am able to see] not outside time, He created time, time is a suspension of eternity. I am trying to get to grips with this NOWness of Jesus, of God. It is one the big revelations of God in the bible indeed it is His name Yahweh, I am what am. When Marth came to Jesus [for He calleth for thee] she fell before Him "Lord if You had been here my brother would not have died" Jesus said "your brother will rise again" she said " oh I know Lord, one day there will be a great resurrection and Lazaruz is gunna break out of his tomb and we'll all get caught up with him" But Jesus groaned, ooh that men could understand the power of God, He said "Martha look at me, I AM the resurrection and the life" God is not in the past, He is not in the future, He is always in the NOW He is the now, this split second, God. Now IS eternity where God dwells, we are bound by time, looking back or looking forward.
Time is the suspension of eternity and it is for a purpose, Paul says the creation was subected to futility IN HOPE that is to say creation was made subject to continual death and renewal. That's what it means, so that man will always need to seek after God for His constant care and faithfulness to renew.
This the bondage that God put upon the creation because of sin, this is the curse, but Paul says that the creation will be set free, indeed it is groaning to be set free and we groan with it. I keep saying this [I'm not sure if anyone else is saying it] but the second coming and the rapture is not the end of the world, it is the beginning of a new age-what you think the earth is gonna be set free from it's bondage after 6000 years for just a couple of hours? there is a glorious age to come the millennial age, the curse will be lifted.
So really you can say that time equates with the curse, the bondage the earth was placed under.
Now all these things may well have been set in place from the very beginning and before man was created, in the foreknowledge of God. But man was created and his dwelling was with God in eternity, when he sinned he became subject to time.
This thing about God not knowing the future, He knows, He sees it, but He is alway in the now. Now is eternity and the dwelling place of God.
There is no "days of miracles" only a God of miracle working power.

#6 Guest_Darkness45_*

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Posted 05 September 2009 - 07:58 PM

In view of the recent discussion in another thread about whether God exists outside of time, I'm particularly interested in parsing the first three words, "In the beginning ..."

What was God trying to tell us when He inspired the penning of those words? What is He saying about Himself? About time?

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Since no TE's said anything yet, I thought I might bring in a different point of view. For me I see "In the beginning" to be a point in time, the moment when God created this universe, and through science I say this happened via the big bang.

I think God was trying to tell us that He created everything we see and nothing would be here if it wasn't for Him. As far as what He was saying about Himself, I see it as communicating to us that He wants us to be aware of His presence, and power, and lends to the idea that God is all powerful.

"About time?" Now this is interesting, I see time as a created dimension in the same way we are aware that God created the dimensions length, width and height. Since God created in the beginning, God is in control of time and is outside of time as we understand it. Perhaps "outside of time" is not correct, but rather that He transcends time. I say this because science has shown that time is a product of the laws of the universe. So "outside of time" is correct in that God is outside the universe, but God is also a part of this universe making it a half truth in saying that God is "outside of time", thus the "transcends time" comes into play.

#7 Hawkins

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Posted 02 December 2009 - 01:51 AM

We're all familiar with the opening verse of the Bible.

"In the beginning, God created the Heavens and the Earth."


1. Time is made suitable for existence
2. Spaces are created
3. Earth is created


darkness was upon the face of the deep = a symbol representing 'universe', or 'black hole' or a status of our universe before Big Bang(?).

water = life
the Spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters = a symbol representing humans, that is, amongst all forms of lives, only humans are granted with the Holy Spirit.

Light = a symbol of physics laws

Now they become,

1. Universe
2. Humans
3. Physics Laws

So symbolically, it says, "For humans, God created this universe governed by physics laws.

#8 ikester7579

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Posted 02 December 2009 - 01:56 AM

1. Time is made suitable for existence
2. Spaces are created
3. Earth is created
darkness was upon the face of the deep = a symbol representing 'universe', or 'black hole' or a status of our universe before Big Bang(?).

water = life
the Spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters = a symbol representing humans, that is, amongst all forms of lives, only humans are granted with the Holy Spirit.

Light = a symbol of physics laws

Now they become,

1. Universe
2. Humans
3. Physics Laws

So symbolically, it says, "For humans, God created this universe governed by physics laws.

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Where did the first light come from, when there are no physical objects to produce light?

#9 Hawkins

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Posted 02 December 2009 - 02:10 AM

Where did the first light come from, when there are no physical objects to produce light?

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Light may not require a source, in accordance to Revelation.

And let me put my point of view another way,

1. find yourself a symbol best represents this universe
darkness was upon the face of the deep

2. find yourself a symbol best represents life
water

and a symbol for humans
the Spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters

3. find yourself a symbol best represents physcis laws
Let there be light

Now put those symbos together, it becomes 'For humans, God created this universe governed by physcis laws.

#10 Ron

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Posted 15 December 2009 - 05:54 AM

Light may not require a source

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Actually, in accordance with Genesis, God said “Let there be light”. Therefore light does indeed require a source. And that Source is God.

#11 Hawkins

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Posted 21 December 2009 - 11:37 PM

Actually, in accordance with Genesis, God said “Let there be light”. Therefore light does indeed require a source. And that Source is God.

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You are correct if you present that way. That's actually what I mean to say. The same is said in Revelation.

#12 Ron

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Posted 19 January 2010 - 10:41 AM

Where did the first light come from, when there are no physical objects to produce light?

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Ummmmm... God? :)













;)




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