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Paleocurrents


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#1 jason777

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Posted 26 March 2010 - 08:57 PM

Here is a video link to a different line of evidence that supports a global flood.

Here is a paper on paleocurrents.



Enjoy.

#2 Geode

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Posted 05 June 2010 - 10:51 PM

Here is a video link to a different line of evidence that supports a global flood.

Here is a paper on paleocurrents.
Enjoy.

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This paper presents the results of a study investigating and exploring the nature and distribution of paleocurrents on a continent wide scale over the entire sedimentary history of North America.

1. In the Cenozoic, as predicted, depositional processes reflect the predominantly basinal character of the Tertiary. With the noted exception of the Paleocene, both Paleogene and Neogene sedimentation reflect no continent wide influence aside from the continuing diffuse influence of the Mississippi drainage. Cenozoic sedimentary patterns have more in common with the Precambrian than they do with either preceding era.

2. In the Mesozoic, generally as expected, currents are broadly dispersed, in all environments, with a gradual shift from predominantly westerly in the Triassic (but with much scatter) to southerly and southeasterly in Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous, to strongly easterly in the Upper Cretaceous. Sediments that cross the Cretaceous-Paleocene boundary, as well as sediments of the Paleocene proper continue this easterly flow, in marked contrast to the strongly westerly Paleozoic trend, and to the general Mesozoic scatter.

3. During the Paleozoic, in sharp contrast to Mesozoic, Cenozoic and Precambrian tendencies, clear and persistent continent-wide trends are normative. Sediments moved generally from east and northeast to west and southwest across the North American Continent. This trend persists throughout the Paleozoic and includes all sediment types and depositional environments. A gradual shift is seen from lower and mid Paleozoic westerly trends to upper Paleozoic southerly trends.


Having similar paleocurrent directions in the most of the rocks deposited during the Paleozoic across most of North America is interesting in that it would appear to indicate that something was in common, even when different accepted or inferred depositional basins are compared. However, the data from Precambrian rocks below this and most of the Mesozoic and Cenozoic rocks that were deposited above the Paleozoic rocks do not show the same commonality and therefore appear to be due to localized influences rather than regional or worldwide influences. Does this make The Flood a Paleozoic event with thousands of feet of later sediment "post-flood" strata and Precambrian sediments "pre-flood" strata?

#3 jason777

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Posted 06 June 2010 - 01:05 AM

Hi Geode,

Having similar paleocurrent directions in the most of the rocks deposited during the Paleozoic across most of North America is interesting in that it would appear to indicate that something was in common, even when different accepted or inferred depositional basins are compared. However, the data from Precambrian rocks below this and most of the Mesozoic and Cenozoic rocks that were deposited above the Paleozoic rocks do not show the same commonality and therefore appear to be due to localized influences rather than regional or worldwide influences.


The paleocurrents suddenly change direction, but the geologic effects are just as global in the Mesozoic.

There are global chalk deposits.

"I was taken by a Turkish friend to visit a cliff section in Upper Cretaceous sediments near Sile on the Black Sea coast. ...what I in fact saw was the familiar white chalk of north-west Europe with black flints and old fossil friends such as Micraster and Echinocorys. What I was looking at was identical with the ‘White Cliffs of Dover’ in England and the rolling plateau of Picardy in France, the quarries of southern Sweden and the cliffs of eastern Denmark. …We have long known, of course, that the White Chalk facies of late Cretaceous times extended all the way from Antrim in Northern Ireland, via England and northern France, through the Low Countries, northern Germany and southern Scandinavia to Poland, Bulgaria and eventually to Georgia in the south of the Soviet Union. We also knew of the same facies in Egypt and Israel. My record was merely an extension of that vast range to the south side of the Black Sea. …Nevertheless, there is even worse to come, for on the other side of the Atlantic in Texas, we find the Augstin Chalk of the same age and character, and...found in Arkansas, Mississippi and Alabama. And most surprising of all, much farther away still in Western Australia, we have the Gingin Chalk of late Cretaceous age, with the same black flints and the same familiar fossils, resting – as in north-west Europe – on glauconitic sands." …Some general explanation is surely needed for such a wide distribution of such a unique facies pp.1-2 "...in north-west Bulgaria, again the basal conglomerate is largely composed of exactly similar purple quartzite pebbles (resting on Permian breccias also like those of midland England) Even if one postulates continent-wide uplift to produce the conglomerate in such widely separated places, it is very difficult to explain why the source rock is also so remarkably similar from one end of Europe to the other. …It is well known that the Newark Group of the eastern seaboard of the United States is exactly like the Trias of north-west Europe.. The similarities are almost laughable.. ...we still have to account for a general facies development in late Carboniferous times that extends in essentially the same form all the way from Texas to the Donetz coal basin, north of the Caspian Sea in the U.S.S.R. This amounts to some 170º of longitude, and closing up the Atlantic by a mere 40º does not really help all that much in explaining the remarkable phenomenon." The Nature of the Stratigraphical Record, pp.6-7.


And there are sedimentary layers that are deposited many hundreds of miles from their source of origin.

Posted Image

I would suggest that the Paleozoic strata was laid down in the bottom of the ocean as flood waters transgressed onto the continents and the Mesozoic is strata that was washed off the continents and was deposited on top of the Paleozoic. Hence, the sudden change in flow direction.

The precambrian appears to be pre-flood sediments that are almost perfectly sheared off like it was bulldozed off the face of the earth. There are no deep channels or any hints of long periods of erosion.

Posted Image

The Tapeats sandstone is then deposited on top of it and it covers roughly 75% of North America.

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Enjoy.

#4 Geode

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Posted 09 June 2010 - 06:07 AM

Hi Jason,

These are interesting references and ideas.

The paleocurrents suddenly change direction, but the geologic effects are just as global in the Mesozoic. 


It would be nice to read the complete paper, but in the abstract form provided I didn't see a reference to any sudden changes in direction. What is indicated for the Mesozoic are terms that show less of a global effect when described, "currents are broadly dispersed, in all environments, with a gradual shift from predominantly westerly in the Triassic (but with much scatter) to southerly and southeasterly in Jurassic"...the scatter and broad dispersal means that the data does not indicate similar conditions to the Cenozoic or Paleozoic. Notice also that the paleocurrent data for the Jurassic is to the south or southeast.

There are global chalk deposits.


Yes, the Creataceous was a period where chalk was deposited in many locations worldwide. The name even comes from the same root. Conditions were warm, sea level high, and continents largely inundated with calm seas conducive to the accumulation of chalk and other deposits indciating calm waters such as limestone deposits. The D. Ager quote hints that he would like to say that the chalk deposits were continuous in nature, but he stops probably because he realizes that they do not all have the same age dates or lithologic characteristics.

And there are sedimentary layers that are deposited many hundreds of miles from their source of origin.


The indicated provenance of the sand in the Jurassic Navajo Sandstone is from hundreds of miles away in the Appalacian region. This determination in the recent paper was made by dating zircons using radiometric methods. However, the indicated direction for the transport of the sand is west, during the time when the other paper indicates paleocurrents to the south to southeast. The Navajo Sandstone is also thought to have been deposited by wind, as shown by the evidence available.

I would suggest that the Paleozoic strata was laid down in the bottom of the ocean as flood waters transgressed onto the continents and the Mesozoic is strata that was washed off the continents and was deposited on top of the Paleozoic. Hence, the sudden change in flow direction.


The Mesozoic strata includes volanics. Permian Coconino sands also look to be wind-blown by various lines of evidence.

The precambrian appears to be pre-flood sediments that are almost perfectly sheared off like it was bulldozed off the face of the earth. There are no deep channels or any hints of long periods of erosion.


An angular unconformity indicates a lot of erosion and a lot of time is represented by the missing rocks. The rocks below are commonly igneous or heavily metamorphosed. Then they had to be tilted and planed off through erosion. This is called The Great Unconformity because it is thought that a lot of time is missing in the "gap"...up to 1200 million years in some estimates in the Grand Canyon. Due to the angular nature of the rock this period would be quite variable. These are estimates are based in part by radiometric dating methods.

Incised valleys may be relatively common in the Precambian rocks below the unconformity.

Ancient river channel system incised on the Precambrian–Cambrian unconformity beneath Jackson County, Ohio

Justin Reuter and Doyle R. Watts

We analyzed a migrated three-dimensional (3-D) seismic reflection data set collected from Jackson County, Ohio, using volume-based voxel visualization technology. Adjusting the opacities of voxels in a time slab centered on the Precambrian reflector revealed a drainage channel system incised on the Ohio Precambrian surface, approximately 1460 m (4800 ft) below sea level. Formation sculpting of the Precambrian surface produced an image of 100-m (330-ft)-wide tributaries on the Precambrian unconformity joining to produce a 400-m (1320-ft)-wide channel roughly parallel to the subsurface trend of the Grenville front beneath Ohio. Broadening and splitting of the zero-phase seismic wavelet that defines the Precambrian reflector reveals the channels. The seismic signature is caused by thin-bed interference effects caused by reflections at the boundary between the channel fill with the overlying Mount Simon Formation and the boundary with the underlying Precambrian surface. The seismic images, therefore, locate a new lithologic unit in the Ohio subsurface. The channels are older than the overlying Mount Simon Formation and so must be at of least Middle Cambrian age. The channel morphology indicates flow in the direction of the Rome trough, approximately 60 km (37 mi) to the south, likely transporting sediment to that basin. Given the tiny volume of Ohio sampled by 3-D seismic methods, such buried channels must be common on the Precambrian surface.


http://aapgbull.geos...tract/88/8/1041

The Tapeats sandstone is then deposited on top of it and it covers roughly 75% of North America.


By definition the Tapeats Sandstone is restricted to the area around the Colorado Plateau. It is a formal formation name. The only way to stretch this to cover such a vast area would be to ignore the rules of startigraphic codes and attempt to include what someone might think are equivalent strata from different formations.




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