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What Do The Masses Really Believe?


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#1 Cassiterides

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Posted 05 August 2010 - 08:34 AM

As the title says, what do the masses believe regarding our origins?

Although you hear evolutionists repeating their propaganda that the levels for support for creationism is low and that anti-evolution views are only held onto by 'religious fundamentalists' this could not be further from the truth.

Polls and research actually indicate that the masses DO NOT believe in evolution, but instead are either skeptical of evolution, having doubt over Darwins theory or are firm believers in creationism. :)

UK:

Majority of Britons say creationism should be taught in schools
http://www.dailymail...ce-classes.html

Poll reveals public doubts over Charles Darwin's theory of evolution
http://www.telegraph...-evolution.html

Half of Britons do not believe in evolution, survey finds
http://www.guardian....vey-creationism
http://www.theosthin...0&RefPageID=110

Britons Unconvinced on Evolution

http://news.bbc.co.u...ech/4648598.stm

Half of us think creationism should be taught alongside evolution
http://www.timesonli...icle6889918.ece

America:

Gallup Poll: Two Thirds of Americans Believe God Created Them
http://www.icr.org/a...ieve-god-creat/

Substantial Numbers of Americans Continue to Doubt Evolution as Explanation for Origin of Humans
http://www.unl.edu/r...n/evol-poll.htm

High Level Government Support for Creationism
http://www.rae.org/highlevel.html

On Darwin's 200th Birthday, Americans Still Divided About Evolution
http://pewresearch.o...ion-creationism

Americans still hold faith in divine creation
http://www.washingto...8-111826-4947r/

100 Scientists, National Poll Challenge Darwinism
http://www.zogby.com...s/readclips.cfm

Darwin smacked in new U.S. poll
Whopping 69 percent of Americans want alternate theories in classroom

http://www.wnd.com/n...RTICLE_ID=49153

Majority reject evolution

http://www.cbsnews.c...ain965223.shtml

#2 Guest_cms13ca_*

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Posted 05 August 2010 - 09:51 AM

As the title says, what do the masses believe regarding our origins?

Although you hear evolutionists repeating their propaganda that the levels for support for creationism is low and that anti-evolution views are only held onto by 'religious fundamentalists' this could not be further from the truth.

Polls and research actually indicate that the masses DO NOT believe in evolution, but instead are either skeptical of evolution, having doubt over Darwins theory or are firm believers in creationism. :D

UK:

Majority of Britons say creationism should be taught in schools
http://www.dailymail...ce-classes.html

Poll reveals public doubts over Charles Darwin's theory of evolution
http://www.telegraph...-evolution.html

Half of Britons do not believe in evolution, survey finds
http://www.guardian....vey-creationism
http://www.theosthin...0&RefPageID=110

Britons Unconvinced on Evolution

http://news.bbc.co.u...ech/4648598.stm

Half of us think creationism should be taught alongside evolution
http://www.timesonli...icle6889918.ece

America:

Gallup Poll: Two Thirds of Americans Believe God Created Them
http://www.icr.org/a...ieve-god-creat/

Substantial Numbers of Americans Continue to Doubt Evolution as Explanation for Origin of Humans
http://www.unl.edu/r...n/evol-poll.htm

High Level Government Support for Creationism
http://www.rae.org/highlevel.html

On Darwin's 200th Birthday, Americans Still Divided About Evolution
http://pewresearch.o...ion-creationism

Americans still hold faith in divine creation
http://www.washingto...8-111826-4947r/

100 Scientists, National Poll Challenge Darwinism
http://www.zogby.com...s/readclips.cfm

Darwin smacked in new U.S. poll
Whopping 69 percent of Americans want alternate theories in classroom

http://www.wnd.com/n...RTICLE_ID=49153

Majority reject evolution

http://www.cbsnews.c...ain965223.shtml

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There is a comparison chart (I will look for it) that looks at opinions on whether people in evolution or creationism in different countries. United States ranked as one of the lowest in evolution believers just ahead of Turkey.

So what, if a majority of people doubt in evolution, which is an appeal to popularity fallacy.

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Posted 05 August 2010 - 09:59 AM

Here is the link to chart I mentioned, which was done in 2005:

Acceptance Of Evolution in Different Countries

#4 gilbo12345

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Posted 07 August 2010 - 05:27 AM

Here is the link to chart I mentioned, which was done in 2005:

Acceptance Of Evolution in Different Countries

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:( No Australia!!

However to be fair what they make the graph out to represent is a bit misleading. Since the question asked was the emergence of humans, rather than evolution as a whole- you from goo (which came from rocks).... If this was asked the answers may be different.


I had to laugh at the graph though. I could imagine a caption under it saying..

"Everybody else believes it, why don't YOU?"

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Posted 07 August 2010 - 09:48 AM

So if creation is taught in schools which version of creation should be taught??? There isn't enough time in one person's life to learn them for every religion.

#6 Cassiterides

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Posted 07 August 2010 - 11:15 AM

So if creation is taught in schools which version of creation should be taught???  There isn't enough time in one person's life to learn them for every religion.

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Multiple Evolution theories or hypotheses:

Darwinian
Lamarckism
Baldwinian

Cooperative eye hypothesis
Hunting hypothesis
Endurance running hypothesis
Grandmother hypothesis
Patriarch Hypothesis
EICA Hypothesis
Saltation Theory

Aquatic ape hypothesis
Out Of Africa hypothesis
Multi-regional hypothesis

Not as if you evolutionists are all in agreement now is it?

#7 gilbo12345

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Posted 08 August 2010 - 01:07 AM

So if creation is taught in schools which version of creation should be taught???  There isn't enough time in one person's life to learn them for every religion.

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1....2....3... Everybody say.... STRAWMAN! :(

When did I say that creationism should be taught in schools?? I'd like to see a quote.

I personally think that either both sides should be taught, OR no sides should be taught and that students should be taught how to think for themselves

#8 Harry

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Posted 08 August 2010 - 06:32 AM

1....2....3... Everybody say.... STRAWMAN!  :)

When did I say that creationism should be taught in schools?? I'd like to see a quote.

I personally think that either both sides should be taught, OR no sides should be taught and that students should be taught how to think for themselves

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When did anyone say that you said creationism should be taught? I don't see where the question was addressed to you. Overreact much?

It is still a valid question. Which creation myth would you like taught alongside evolution?

#9 gilbo12345

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Posted 08 August 2010 - 06:44 AM

I personally think that either both sides should be taught, OR no sides should be taught and that students should be taught how to think for themselves

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Harry you didn't read this?

#10 AFJ

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Posted 08 August 2010 - 06:55 AM

When did anyone say that you said creationism should be taught? I don't see where the question was addressed to you. Overreact much?

It is still a valid question. Which creation myth would you like taught alongside evolution?

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How about this? You respect millions of Christian American taxpayers whose money is used to pay science teachers. These people also know that for 1500 of years of European history, Biblical creation and Noah's flood were accepted as fact, even by scientists who laid the foundation for Lyell and Darwin.

Now modern man acts like none of it happened. This is because enlightenment professors and liberal theologians got into our higher education, who in turn educated our judges, and journalists. Now what has been created is an alternate natural history (i.e. the geologic timescale).

What you are not acknowledging is that evolution was made up in men's minds. Like Lyell, who was very influential, but obviously assumed all things continue the same. Present sedimentation rates justified calculations of how long it would take to build layers of limestone and other sedimentary rock. But this precludes a past catastrophic flood which is impossible to measure in the present.

#11 Harry

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Posted 08 August 2010 - 07:37 AM

How about this? You respect millions of Christian American taxpayers whose money is used to pay science teachers. These people also know that for 1500 of years of European history, Biblical creation and Noah's flood were accepted as fact, even by scientists who laid the foundation for Lyell and Darwin.

Now modern man acts like none of it happened. This is because enlightenment professors and liberal theologians got into our higher education, who in turn educated our judges, and journalists. Now what has been created is an alternate natural history (i.e. the geologic timescale).

What you are not acknowledging is that evolution was made up in men's minds. Like Lyell, who was very influential, but obviously assumed all things continue the same. Present sedimentation rates justified calculations of how long it would take to build layers of limestone and other sedimentary rock. But this precludes a past catastrophic flood which is impossible to measure in the present.

You are assuming that I agree with the idea of public education. I don't.

The question is STILL valid. Which version of the creation myth would you teach?

#12 Cassiterides

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Posted 08 August 2010 - 07:44 AM

What form or theory of evolution do/would you approve of?

Darwinian
Lamarckism
Baldwinian

Cooperative eye hypothesis
Hunting hypothesis
Endurance running hypothesis
Grandmother hypothesis
Patriarch Hypothesis
EICA Hypothesis
Saltation Theory

Aquatic ape hypothesis
Out Of Africa hypothesis
Multi-regional hypothesis

#13 AFJ

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Posted 08 August 2010 - 09:06 AM

You are assuming that I agree with the idea of public education. I don't.

The question is STILL valid. Which version of the creation myth would you teach?

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This is not a black and white issue. We have to respect our supreme court's interpretation of the first amendment. In my state of Louisiana, there have been court battles for years. Recently the ID lawyers won a case, where students in LA are now allowed to ask questions about other origin theories, but the teacher can not formally teach them. Looks like a situation for another court battle don't you agree?

In my humble opinion, I have a proposal that would ensure separation of church and state, while guarding the religious freedom of the students.

Since there are valid PhDs from all other the world that are ID or creationist on origins, it would do no harm to at least offer approved literature. State approved books could not advocate any particular religion, or religious book--it would have to be only scientific evidence which could lead to a conclusion of creation ex nehilo. It must stop as that conclusion period. Or it could be that which attempts to rebuttal evolution and uniformintarianism.

The reason I say this is that if there are some young people whose families are religious, they at least have a scientific rebuttal to evolution. As it is now, there is no rebuttal. This infringes on religious freedom, which is guaranteed by our constitution.

I know we are a long way from that, but we are doing everything else in America to offer inclusion--such as the recent lifting of the ban on g*y marriage.

#14 JoshuaJacob

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Posted 08 August 2010 - 09:21 AM

Louisiana passed a bill last year that critical thinking can be taught in the classroom along with the "theory" of evolution. Meaning that students could question the theory. Of course die hard evolutionists went into an uproar about this and threatened our state by canceling annual conventions they held here and some other functions. Its ok for their religion to be taught in the public schools, but not anyone else's.

#15 JoshuaJacob

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Posted 08 August 2010 - 09:27 AM

Hey AFJ, I live right down the road from You in Hammond :)

Seems we were thinking the same thing at the same time lol

#16 gilbo12345

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Posted 08 August 2010 - 09:37 AM

This is not a black and white issue.  We have to respect our supreme court's interpretation of the first amendment.  In my state of Louisiana, there have  been court battles for years.  Recently the ID lawyers won a case, where students in LA are now allowed to ask questions about other origin theories, but the teacher can not formally teach them.  Looks like a situation for another court battle don't you agree?

In my humble opinion, I have a proposal that would ensure separation of church and state, while guarding the religious freedom of the students.  

Since there are valid PhDs from all other the world that are ID or creationist on origins, it would do no harm to at least offer approved literature.  State approved books could not advocate any particular religion, or religious book--it would have to be only scientific evidence which could lead to a conclusion of creation ex nehilo. It must stop as that conclusion period. Or it could be that which attempts to rebuttal evolution and uniformintarianism. 

The reason I say this is that if there are some young people whose families are religious, they at least have a scientific rebuttal to evolution.  As it is now, there is no rebuttal. This infringes on religious freedom, which is guaranteed by our constitution.

I know we are a long way from that, but we are doing everything else in America to offer inclusion--such as the recent lifting of the ban on g*y marriage.

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This is the same reason why I had a debate on our Uni discussion board about evolution... To give those who did not want to bow down to evolution a scientific leg to stand on, and to let them know that evolution is NOT the "be all, end all" of scientific truth.

@ Harry. I already posed that either both sides should be taught, (with a grain of salt for each to be fair), or neither, rather teach the students HOW to think and process information logically, then let them figure out whats best for themselves.

#17 scott

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Posted 08 August 2010 - 10:03 AM

You are assuming that I agree with the idea of public education. I don't.

The question is STILL valid. Which version of the creation myth would you teach?

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No creation myth should be taught. Only the true 6 day Creation none myth of the Bible should be taught.

Anyways all this whining and complaining about what should and shouldn't be taught is complete Nonesense. I learned more about Christianity in College than I ever did in Public Schools. Nobody had any problem whatsoever when we had discussions about Creation or Christianity. Quite frankly it doesn't matter if it is taught. The only people getting upset about it are the Die-hard Atheist/ Evolutionist.

#18 philosophik

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Posted 08 August 2010 - 06:56 PM

No creation myth should be taught.  Only the true 6 day Creation none myth of the Bible should be taught.

Anyways all this whining and complaining about what should and shouldn't be taught is complete NonesenseI learned more about Christianity in College than I ever did in Public Schools.  Nobody had any problem whatsoever when we had discussions about Creation or Christianity.  Quite frankly it doesn't matter if it is taught.  The only people getting upset about it are the Die-hard Atheist/ Evolutionist.

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I agree with you 100%. In fact I have no problem with both creationism and evolution being taught alongside each other or both not being taught at all. The bottom line is that the average person, educated or not, is aware of the evolution vs. creationism debate. Any one who wants to know more has a wealth of information available on both POV if they so desire to seek it. If someone in school is a die hard christian it does not matter whether or not evolution is taught, they won't believe it. And you would be hard pressed to find someone in a developed country that does not know the basic tenets of Christianity, and if they so desired, could join a church. There are more than 2 billion christians in the world, most of which have no problem teaching what they believe. I would argue that that is way more than teachers in school who teach evolution. I would even bet there are more bibles in the world than text books that teach evolution. That is pure speculation of course, but would anyone disagree?

#19 AFJ

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Posted 08 August 2010 - 07:17 PM

I agree with you 100%. In fact I have no problem with both creationism and evolution being taught alongside each other or both not being taught at all. The bottom line is that the average person, educated or not, is aware of the evolution vs. creationism debate. Any one who wants to know more has a wealth of information available on both POV if they so desire to seek it. If someone in school is a die hard christian it does not matter whether or not evolution is taught, they won't believe it. And you would be hard pressed to find someone in a developed country that does not know the basic tenets of Christianity, and if they so desired, could join a church. There are more than 2 billion christians in the world, most of which have no problem teaching what they believe. I would argue that that is way more than teachers in school who teach evolution. I would even bet there are more bibles in the world than text books that teach evolution. That is pure speculation of course, but would anyone disagree?

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You might have a point there on the Bibles. The problem is that most people don't read them, including Christians :D .

Most watch the TV, which is predominately going with evolution -at least the news and government officials. So it's an information war really.

You know what's funny. I'm 48 years old. When I wa sa kid in the 60's, the news used to talk about TASS the propagandist, atheistic (communistic) press of Russia. But I just read a paper from a Russian geological team studying the formations in the Crimean Pennensula. They are creationists. Is it the other way around now? Maybe TASS of '65 could be the CNN of 2010! :)

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Posted 08 August 2010 - 07:20 PM

Louisiana passed a bill last year that critical thinking can be taught in the classroom along with the "theory" of evolution. Meaning that students could question the theory. Of course die hard evolutionists went into an uproar about this and threatened our state by canceling annual conventions they held here and some other functions. Its ok for their religion to be taught in the public schools, but not anyone else's.

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Evolution is obviously a theory, why put the word in quotes? It is a conceptual explanation of general phenomena and the evidence, whether you accept it or not, is widely publicized. If critical thinking is being strategically placed in the curriculum next to evolution then the TOE is being unfairly singled out amongst those scientific theories supported by professional consensus.

Even if any given religion is the truth teaching it in school is unnecessary - that is the prerogative of the churches. If kids in Louisiana don't receive an education in orthodox natural history then they will be disadvantaged compared to kids from Uruguay, Finland, Wales, New South Wales, South Africa, South Korea, Bulgaria, Nova Scotia etc etc.




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