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DaVinci Code


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#1 Method

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Posted 15 March 2005 - 03:49 PM

Before I start, let me make a few things clear. I am aware of the fact that "The DaVinci Code" is total fabrication. My only intent is to ask a couple of questions from the christians here at this board. I am not here for a debate, just for my own curiosity.

I was watching a documentary on "The DaVinci Code" by Dan Brown. One of the commentators said something interesting. To paraphrase, he said that the popularity of the book reflects a need amongst our society to redefine what Christianity is. Due to the influx of technology and science and the inherent changes in our society from this influx, people are now looking for Christianity to change as well.

I can relate to what the commentator is saying. I can't quite put my finger on it, but it seems that many in society are looking for something fresh and new. Does anyone else sense this as well? Do you think this new attitude is a good thing or a bad thing?

#2 Guest_92g_*

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Posted 15 March 2005 - 06:23 PM

I think these verses sum it up pretty well:

2TH 2:11 And for this reason God will send upon them a deluding influence so that they might believe what is false,

2PE 2:3 and in their greed they will exploit you with false words; their judgment from long ago is not idle, and their destruction is not asleep.


Of course, evolution is an even better example...... :) :)

Terry

#3 Guest_George R_*

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Posted 16 March 2005 - 10:24 AM

The "New Agers" that I know love the DVC book.

Man has been chasing mind-fads since before Gladiators fought in the coliseum. I think Cicero had a lot to say about it and was disgusted by novel philosophies. I think Socrates had a lot to say about the "Sophists" and was disgusted by mind-fads.

It is sweet and delightful to believe that you and your generation has uncovered a new truth.

All that gain ... and no effort required. Just dump the ideas you never learned anyway, and get a guru. Everybody wants to join the new club.

Novelty won't last, but is addictive anyway.

Ever wonder why the Israelistes lost interest in Jehovah and his prophets and ran to the idol-makers, infant-sacrificers and temples of holy prostitutes? They had new ideas. They were a fresh change.

And they required no deep internal commitment and held up no need for difficult slow personal change.

It is only a matter of time that another "me-first" religion gets popular. If that is a craving for "something more" then welcome to it.

#4 Guest_The Deacon_*

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Posted 16 March 2005 - 12:38 PM

  To paraphrase, he said that the popularity of the book reflects a need amongst our society to redefine what Christianity is.  Due to the influx of technology and science and the inherent changes in our society from this influx, people are now looking for Christianity to change as well.


Let me first say, Way to go George! You nailed it.

Having said that I will add another reason: 2 Timothy 4:2-4, "Preach the word; be instant in season, out of season; reprove, rebuke, exhort with all longsuffering and doctrine. For the time will come when they will not endure sound doctrine; but after their own lusts shall they heap to themselves teachers, having itching ears; And they shall turn away their ears from the truth, and shall be turned unto fables."

I can relate to what the commentator is saying.  I can't quite put my finger on it, but it seems that many in society are looking for something fresh and new.  Does anyone else sense this as well?  Do you think this new attitude is a good thing or a bad thing?


It is a good example of the fact that most men simply will not have the truth that is given to them. Instead they desperately look for some alternative that more comports with how they wish things were.

#5 chance

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Posted 16 March 2005 - 02:32 PM

The need to know is a very powerful emotion, we crave a quick and easy answer to every problem that confronts us. So when someone writes a book (I haven’t read the The DaVinci Code) that reveals some final answer it’s like offering drink to a drunk.
It’s irresistible even if only for entertainment e.g. TV solves the worlds problem in a two hour stint, or 30 min for a sit-com, there are few if any TV shows that leave the climax to the end of a mini series without intermediate goals along the way.

IMO he wrote the book to make a lot of money, and as long as they keep spelling the authors name correctly ……….. :)

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Posted 16 March 2005 - 04:27 PM

I think what it boils down to, is that people want something new. They don't understand that God is who He is, and cannot be repackaged. But some look and say: Boring... So they look in other directions. So when someone comes up with something new and some what interesting, they jump on it only to find that it did not fill the need. And every person that thinks up these ideas, makes a quick buck of those in need. I have a friend right now that is continually searching. He's caught up into new age. He's been in the occult, and even taught it at one time (He was a registered warlock, he might still be one, I don't talk to him about it, and he don't know that I know about what he is).

The thing is, he has never found fulfillment. And I have a feeling he never will. Because his mind is closed, and he is more interested in showing someone how wrong they are, and how right he is. The only reason I stay friends with him is in hope that one day God will give me an open door to witness to him. But for now, the door is closed.

His form of God is just like the one that came from this DVC idea. It almost looks like the real one. And in many ways it has some of the same ideas. But ideas don't make a real God.

#7 Guest_George R_*

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Posted 17 March 2005 - 08:37 PM

I was giving this a bit more thought... it now seems even a far more dismal portent to me.

There is an obvious need for hope in our era.

But hope is not where they are looking. So... they will find a substitute.



The DVC has been popular in an era when

- other Jesus-family books are in the shelves, such as Holy Blood, Holy Grail and its kin

- Dead Sea Scroll interpretations point to some real enlightenment re the origins of Christianity and many wacko leaps of credulity that include among other things:
... the possibility that the historical place for counter-Pauline leaders will be re-painted in a new history of the early Church

- "secret histories" from Tsardom to Masonry to 9/11 seem to have a grasp of facts that make traditional explanations seem shallow, and center on secret conspiracies and clubs.

- the end of the world through ecological catastrophe means has surpassed the specter of a nuclear war

- major crises (war, energy crisis, water crisis, plagues) pop up every day


Some of this does demonstrate an interest in oddball esoteric explanations and a thirst for interesting (or scadalous or secret) facts.

Science is seen as a opener of doors into religious history. At the same time, religion is booming and collapsing at the same time.

Ever since the role of religion in N.American society has taken a constitutional and self-destructive dump ... religion is relegated to the small corners of the public square as a historical vestige and unwelcome house guest.

The DVC lets people get an "insight" into religion
- with no risk of buying into traditional demands made by Christianity
- while nominally exploring Christ as a person
- taking on religious words and scientific jargon
- and scandalous secret knowledge
- and the hint of destruction
- with a view merely to obtain entertainment

In other words it fits into all of the above trends.

#8 Method

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Posted 18 March 2005 - 11:49 AM

Thanks to all for their answers. I agree with a few and disagree with a few, but they are all opinions after all. I find that the popularity of the DVC has opened a window into the psyche of modern human culture, and it is a very interesting picture. I really don't see the DVC as challenging the divinity of Jesus Christ, only the traditions that have been passed down orally and through literature. Anyway, tbanks again for your input.




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