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Mar 4 2011 - 100m Years To Change A Binding Site


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#1 Fred Williams

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Posted 05 March 2011 - 12:00 PM

What's a Binding Site and How Long to Evolve a Change? Real Science Friday co-hosts Fred Williams and Bob Enyart describe a binding site, which is a place on a protein or in DNA where other molecules can attach, somewhat like the shuttle docking to the space station. And according to an article at the National Institutes of Health, it would take 100 million years by a Darwinian process to change a single binding site in the human genome. Oops. Supposedly ALL OF HUMAN EVOLUTION from small Australopithecus chimp-like creatures to Homo sapiens has happened in only five million years. Then how could it take 100 million years just to change a binding site? This is yet another nail in Charles Darwin's coffin beneath the Westminster Abbey.

http://kgov.com/bel/20110304

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#2 AFJ

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Posted 20 March 2011 - 06:17 AM

What's a Binding Site and How Long to Evolve a Change? Real Science Friday co-hosts Fred Williams and Bob Enyart describe a binding site, which is a place on a protein or in DNA where other molecules can attach, somewhat like the shuttle docking to the space station. And according to an article at the National Institutes of Health, it would take 100 million years by a Darwinian process to change a single binding site in the human genome. Oops. Supposedly ALL OF HUMAN EVOLUTION from small Australopithecus chimp-like creatures to Homo sapiens has happened in only five million years. Then how could it take 100 million years just to change a binding site? This is yet another nail in Charles Darwin's coffin beneath the Westminster Abbey.

http://kgov.com/bel/20110304

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Of course, evolutionists will challenge the 100 million figure, but completely accept the 5 million. Because evolutionary biologists are infallable, and there are many more of them supposedly, and they have all the grant money, the media, the universitities, the peer review publications. What do those silly creationists know?

And any change in one would necessitate a change in others. If I change a bolt size, I have to have a different wrench, or bolt hole.

#3 gilbo12345

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Posted 03 May 2011 - 06:30 PM

Of course, evolutionists will challenge the 100 million figure, but completely accept the 5 million.  Because evolutionary biologists are infallable, and there are many more of them supposedly, and they have all the grant money, the media, the universitities, the peer review publications.  What do those silly creationists know?

And any change in one would necessitate a change in others.  If I change a bolt size, I have to have a different wrench, or bolt hole.

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Exactly, this requires that mulitple mutations that correspond to each other be occuring at the same time, a problem in one will destroy the mechanism, halving the probability that it will occur with no deleterious effect.

Furthermore, to get corresponding mutations to occur in the same "species", at the relatively same time, and the same locality pushes this probability even lower.



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