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Why Do Jehovah's Witnesses Believe In A Paradise Earth? Should We?


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#1 MamaElephant

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Posted 19 March 2012 - 09:37 AM

In brief:

Psalm 37:29 The righteous shall inherit the land, and dwell therein for ever.

Matthew 5:5 Blessed are the meek, for they will inherit the earth.

Proverbs 2:21 For the upright are the ones that will reside in the earth, and the blameless are the ones that will be left over in it.

All I ever heard was Christian churches taught that we go to heaven. So I thought I couldn't possibly go to a Christian church. I asked a friend (member of a non-denominational Christian Church, and btw I was lectured about being friends with her) about it over dinner and she explained her beliefs. She said that Christians are lifted up to heaven in the rapture, and later returned to earth. Just knowing that she believed this was a seed planted for my husband and I. I found this belief to coincide with the Bible. Be sure that you as a Christian understand this and share this with JWs, in doing so you will protect yourself from their reasoning and also plant seeds.

According to JWs, the Great Crowd is supposed to be a separate group from the 144,000. The 144,000 are in heaven and the Great Crowd on earth. I know one woman who is grief stricken upon learning that her son believes himself to be one of the 144,000, because this means that they will be separated in "paradise"!

This is the verse JWs use to explain the Great Crowd; Revelation 7:9,10 "After this I beheld, and, lo, a great multitude, which no man could number, of all nations, and kindreds, and people, and tongues, stood before the throne, and before the Lamb, clothed with white robes, and palms in their hands; And cried with a loud voice, saying, Salvation to our God which sitteth upon the throne, and unto the Lamb.

Now compare to Revelation 5:9,10
9 And they sang a new song, saying:

“You are worthy to take the scroll,
And to open its seals;
For You were slain,
And have redeemed us to God by Your blood
Out of every tribe and tongue and people and nation,
10 And have made us kings and priests to our God;
And we shall reign on the earth.”

Doesn't this seem to be the same group?

According to Jehovah's Witnesses they are not. They will tell you that Revelation 5:9,10 is referring to the 144,000 and that they will "rule as kings and priests over the earth". So they will reason that they are ruling in heaven and they will reason doesn't that require subjects? These subjects are the great crowd on earth.

There are several problems with this Revelation 5:9,10 says on the earth, not over the earth, and this is true if you look up the original Greek. In addition, Revelation 5:9,10 speaks of a group out of every tribe tongue people and nation, just like Revelation 7:9,10 that the JWs are trying to say are a separate group.

Taking it further if you look at Revelation 19:1 you will see a great crowd in heaven! What? They can't be in heaven! Oh yes, look, they are!

JWs will also use Revelation 21:3,4 to say that the earth is the paradise being spoken of, because God is dwelling with mankind. What they fail to notice is that in Revelation 21:1-2 we see New Jerusalem coming down out of heaven. At this point we have heaven on earth.

That is the nutshell.

#2 jason

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Posted 19 March 2012 - 05:30 PM

we dont stay in heaven though. read what happens at the end of revalation where does god dwell and also what isiah says on the new heavens and earth. though most churches teach that is in the millenium. im amil or thereabouts and have all but abandoned futurism. that said paul spoke about the whole creation groaneth for redemption this means that the earth and all of creation will be restored to perfection without the curse. which is stated in revalation as well.

#3 MamaElephant

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Posted 20 March 2012 - 08:29 AM

If you are speaking to an ex-JW who has accepted Christ, but still won't go to church because churches seem to not know about this future earth, then you can point out the many verses that speak of our citizenship in heaven or our longing to be with the Lord. A Christian doesn't care whether paradise is in heaven, on earth, or under the earth, we just want to be with Him.

In addition, Colossians 3:2 really makes it seem like all of this JW focus on a paradise earth isn't approved by God.

we dont stay in heaven though. read what happens at the end of revalation where does god dwell and also what isiah says on the new heavens and earth. though most churches teach that is in the millenium. im amil or thereabouts and have all but abandoned futurism. that said paul spoke about the whole creation groaneth for redemption this means that the earth and all of creation will be restored to perfection without the curse. which is stated in revalation as well.

Yes.

#4 jason

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Posted 20 March 2012 - 03:33 PM

i had to ask and i read my bible and i know where i stand and then when i found i was off then i began to relook. god in the end of it all for man says in a myriad of places that the earth will be restored. i would still find a church after prayer. why? because no human will ever know how God will work his plans. we arent meant too and any christian who says we know how god will judge man is off unless he is quoting a scripture. usually with futurism exegesis is thrown out the window. a classic example of this is that two gospel thread. that is what the man schofield taught and most churches bought into and as the years past rejected tid bits.

Strangely, Scofield ignores the one division that is self evident between the Old and New Covenants. Mark 1:1 categorically states, 'The beginning of the Gospel of Jesus Christ', And Matthew 11:13 further informs us, 'For all the Prophets and the Law prophesied until John. Yet Scofield places the life and ministry of Jesus within the dispensation of Law along with John the Baptist and the Old Testament Prophets, arguing that the sixth dispensation of grace only 'begins with the death and resurrection of Christ'.92 So, for example, the Lord's Prayer, and in particular the petition, 'Forgive us our debts, as we also have forgiven our debtors.' (Matthew 6:12) is not applicable to the church, since it is 'legal ground'.93 He even suggests the possibility of salvation by works,

As a dispensation, grace begins with the death and resurrection of Christ (Rom. 3. 24-26; 4. 24, 25). The point of testing is no longer legal obedience as the condition of salvation, but acceptance or rejection of Christ... The predicted end of the testing of man under grace is the apostasy of the professing church...94

Scofield believed the Gospels were essentially for the Jews and therefore not relevant for the Church. In the note attached to Ephesians 3, he boldly states, 'In his (Paul's) writings alone we find the doctrine, position, walk, and destiny of the Church.'95 Unfortunately, Scofield seems to impose divisions that do not exist in Scripture and ignores those that do.

This research, however, is not primarily concerned with an evaluation of Scofield's theological framework, nor even with how he has influenced the rise of dispensationalism. Others have already done sp as on the relationship between law and grace.96 It is with Scofield's more specific prophetic speculations concerning the relationship between Israel and the Church which this research will concentrate on since they have had such a profound effect on much contemporary Christian Zionism.

As has been noted, in 'Rightly Dividing the Word of God', Scofield laid out the dispensational presuppositions which determined his theological framework,

These periods are marked off in Scripture by some change in God's method of dealing with mankind, in respect of two questions, of sin, and of man's responsibility. Each of the dispensations may be regarded as a new test of the natural man, and each ends in judgment - marking his utter failure in every dispensation.97

Such a pessimistic view of human history is no where more evident than in what Scofield teaches about his sixth dispensation, the church-age


http://www.theologue...#mozTocId538636
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