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Adam Nagy

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Adam Nagy last won the day on August 11 2014

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About Adam Nagy

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    Honorable Member
  • Birthday 09/10/1976

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  • What is your Gender?
    Male
  • How old are you?
    37
  • What is your affiliation/religion?
    Christian
  • What is your Worldview?
    Young Earth Creationist
  • Where do you live (i.e. Denver, Colorado)
    Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

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  1. Can we recognize a clear difference between events that are akin to a snowball gaining weight rolling down a hill versus a child using his/her hands in a deliberate set of movements to form the initial snowball in the first place?
  2. It looks like participants for my priming exercise have come up short... I'll move on assuming the point is understood. Let's move on to two different circumstances, that in principle evolutionists would prefer to keep indistinguishable; First: Making a pot of coffee Second: A full pot of coffee crashing to the floor and breaking. What is distinguishable between the two events? For starters, I would say the second is more complex than the first. I would also say that the events that occur as the pot is crashing to the floor are more complicated to enumerate than the first (the pot strikes the floor, a crack develops in the bottom right corner and travels diagonally in a clockwise direction, the coffee exits the lid .01 seconds prior to going through the crack, the splash strikes the wall, etc...) The first is a mixture of guidance and reaction. The first requires instructions to purpose reactions for a goal. The second as merely an unintended sequence of events that eventually result in equilibrium (the glass stops rocking, the drops on the wall stop dripping the coffee cools, etc...). The moment a cleanup effort starts the activity has likeness to making the coffee and not the chain reaction that occurs from the dropping of the full coffee pot.
  3. Adam Nagy

    James White Bob Enyart Debate

    I finally completed this debate after Bob posted the video version on Facebook. I think James White won that debate but I also think that both sides were incomplete. I felt like I was entertaining a mildly more sophisticated debate between Teejay and Dig4gold.
  4. I guess everyone is busy thinking about how to fill in the blanks?
  5. Adam Nagy

    Soft Tissues Found In Dinosaur Fossils

    Huh... Wah! who? Where, what? Uhh... Do you have to be so blunt? It's not very sciency...
  6. Excellent! How about... 0.1 - verify the location of coffee grounds
  7. Before I actually get to the name-sake of this thread I'd like to go through an exercise and hopefully have some fun... How many of you have ever been tasked with articulating every step, in painstaking detail, of a given task? If you had to, could you detail a task instruction-for-instruction? Let's pick something simple like making a pot of coffee. I'll start... And if this thread intrigues you, help me by filling in steps in this hypothetical flow-chart I missed... 1. Put coffee grounds in basket 2. Put water in reservoir 3. Turn on coffee pot 4. Drink coffee when done What, if any, steps are missing?
  8. Adam Nagy

    Stephen C. Meyer Nails It Again

    Eric Metaxas did a great job keeping the dialogue entertaining. That's a great interview, Mark! Thanks for sharing it. Two thumbs up!
  9. Adam Nagy

    Soft Tissues Found In Dinosaur Fossils

    I was going to start a new thread just for radiometric dating but this discussion is too good to sidetrack. Great post, Bonedigger! SN, as a friend and fellow poster (and not in a disrespectful way at all), let the scales fall from your eyes. The right side of this discussion could always use an intelligent articulate person like yourself. You'd be in good company. We've all had that moment where we realized we were on the wrong side of an argument.
  10. Done!... http://evolutionfairytale.com/forum//index.php?showtopic=6145
  11. Adam Nagy

    The Science Of Anti-Science...

    This inquiry is worthy of its own thread. Are people being intellectually enlightened or rocked to sleep by the stories and fables purporting to be scientific? The science popularizers of today also seem to be supporting intellectual laziness. Is this view defensible?
  12. Lifepsyop, you just asked a question that merits its own thread...
  13. Adam Nagy

    Problem I - Cratering. 1. The Moon

    Definitely a human problem.
  14. Adam Nagy

    Soft Tissues Found In Dinosaur Fossils

    The problem is, your response IS the very thing that's being dismantled regarding radiometric dating. You repeating it doesn't make it any stronger. Sure. I'll warn you now. You'll get really frustrated if you get in to a discussion about this, sharpening your pencil to do some figuring, while ignoring the issue of how the assumptions, methods and pronouncements of radiometric dating are flawed... at least, flawed to be a tangible form of empirical chronology in the methodological sense.
  15. Adam Nagy

    Soft Tissues Found In Dinosaur Fossils

    SN, you're not answering the questions. You are rephrasing and repackaging the same excuses that produce the very questionable nature of the entire enterprise. The reason you don't know how these tests are calibrated and validated is because there is no test and/or validation. All you have are lame excuses for why blind tests fail and lame stories for how there is consilience. If you think about it, the whole effort boils down to a tautology... "These samples show similar test results, they must be the same age." "How do you know they're the same age?" "Well, they showed similar test results." When a truly independent correlation study is made for samples of known age the excuses start to fly and we're told "Pay no attention to the man behind the lab coat! He's a SCIENTIST!"
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