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thatsneakyguy

Riddles

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So from this thread, I thought I would start a thread on riddles.

Here is a riddle I remember from when I was young:

 

A man once had to travel with a wolf, a goat and a cabbage.

 

He had to take good care of them and keep them separated, since the wolf would like to eat the goat if he would get the chance, while the goat would eat the tasty cabbage.

 

After some traveling, he suddenly stood before a river. This river could only be crossed using the small boat laying nearby at a shore.

 

The boat was only good enough to take himself and one of his loads across the river. The other two subjects/objects he had to leave on their own.

 

How must the man row across the river back and forth, to take himself as well as his luggage safe to the other side of the river, without having one eating another?

 

 

You can google the answer, it's a fairly popular riddle.

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Here's another one I found, it's more difficult:

 

Drink for Thought
 
A wise man is lost in the desert with no water. He encounters a wise guy who is drinking from a jug. Seeing the wise man approach, the wise guy corks the jug. “May I have some of your water, please?†the wise man asks. “I am dying of thirst.â€
 
The wise guy replies, “Yes, but only if you agree to three conditions: 1) You must not remove the cork from the jug; 2) You must not break up the cork or make a hole in it; and 3) You must not damage the jug or make a hole in it.†The wise man agrees.
 
How does he do it?
 
:)

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Here's another one I found, it's more difficult:

 

Drink for Thought
 
A wise man is lost in the desert with no water. He encounters a wise guy who is drinking from a jug. Seeing the wise man approach, the wise guy corks the jug. “May I have some of your water, please?†the wise man asks. “I am dying of thirst.â€
 
The wise guy replies, “Yes, but only if you agree to three conditions: 1) You must not remove the cork from the jug; 2) You must not break up the cork or make a hole in it; and 3) You must not damage the jug or make a hole in it.†The wise man agrees.
 
How does he do it?
 
:)

 

The first one was too easy.  There are lots of variations on it.....

 

The second one.... the wise man pushes the cork into the jug.

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A man once had to travel with a wolf, a goat and a cabbage.

 

He had to take good care of them and keep them separated, since the wolf would like to eat the goat if he would get the chance, while the goat would eat the tasty cabbage.

 

After some traveling, he suddenly stood before a river. This river could only be crossed using the small boat laying nearby at a shore.

 

The boat was only good enough to take himself and one of his loads across the river. The other two subjects/objects he had to leave on their own.

 

How must the man row across the river back and forth, to take himself as well as his luggage safe to the other side of the river, without having one eating another?

 

I'm guessing he could swap one.

 

He could take the sheep first then go back across, get the cabbage, then take the sheep back with him, leave the sheep alone then take the wolf across to be with the cabbage, then he could go back for the sheep?

 

(Thanks for posting them) :D

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Piasan: The first one was too easy.  There are lots of variations on it.....

 

I'm not sure there are variations, because if you take the wolf first the cabbage gets eaten and if you take the cabbage first the sheep gets eaten. You can only take the sheep first. But THEN, there might be some variations afterwards, as you say.

 

I SUSPECT the full riddle is how to do it in the fewest possible crossings, in which case I can't be bothered finding out the fewest ways to be honest. Lol

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I have a silly one, whether I remember it subconsciously or have invented it myself I can't know but it should be pretty easy. 

 

You are alone in the wilderness with your millions in cash, and it is freezing. You have a lighter and the only way it seems to keep warm is if you burn your fortune. :D It's very cold enough to perhaps kill you but there is no wind so it's perfect to burn the cash. What do you do? There is enough cash to keep the fire burning just enough to save you but you will lose your millions. Alternatively you can keep the millions but not for long as you will be dead by morning.

 

:P

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Seems simple enough. If there is nothing else to burn, you might try stuffing the cash into your clothes for added insulation, but if it's cold enough to freeze you by morning, your own body heat is probably insufficient to keep you alive even then. I'd burn the money. In the end it's better to be alive and poor than dead and rich, but I imagine that's the moral you're trying to convey anyway.

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Close enough GG. The answer is that you cover yourself with the cash. :D Notice it says, "There is enough cash to keep the fire burning", and "there is no wind". When you think about it - a fire would have to burn all night, and paper burns quickly, so there is enough paper dollars there for a lot of insulation. ;)

 

But I approve of your moral, although I would modify it so say, "better to be alive and not rich than dead." ...I think many people are alive without millions but we just don't notice that we have riches because they are mundane.

 

My point is this - the richest man in the world in the 17th century, didn't have a TV, a car or a mobile phone. We tend to label things, "rich" but once we attain them it is relative because Mr Doe has more than us so that means we think we are poor. But if you have a good car or house or technology and can afford it easily, is that really, "poor?"

 

The world tells us we always need more, but I don't fall for it. I don't need a phone that can have it's screen touched instead of pressing buttons, nor will I need one that can dance and obey my voice commands. 

 

Rant over. ;) 

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I'm not sure there are variations, because if you take the wolf first the cabbage gets eaten and if you take the cabbage first the sheep gets eaten. You can only take the sheep first. But THEN, there might be some variations afterwards, as you say.

 

I SUSPECT the full riddle is how to do it in the fewest possible crossings, in which case I can't be bothered finding out the fewest ways to be honest. Lol

 

I think Piasan was saying there are variations in the riddle.  Sometimes it is a wolf, rabbit, and lettuce, or sometimes wolf, duck, and seeds.  It's a classic riddle.

But you got the right answer, I will post some more.

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Here are three more, the first one is also an old classic:

 

1.

You’re in a room with two doors. There’s a guard at each door. One door is the exit, but behind the other door is something that will kill you. You’re told that one guard always tells the truth and the other guard always lies. You don’t know which guard is which. You are allowed to ask one question to either of the guards to determine which door is the exit.

 

What question should you ask?

 

 

2.

You have 10 heavy bags that are each filled with many gold coins. Nine bags have genuine gold coins - but one bag has fake gold coins that look identical.  The genuine gold coins weigh 10g each, but the fake coins weigh 1.1g each. 

 

Using a digital scale and only one weighing, how do you figure out which bag has the fake coins?

 

3.

You’re standing in a hallway with three light switches on the wall.  Each light switch turns on a different lamp inside an adjacent closed room. The door is closed to the room, and you can’t see inside.  You can’t open the door except to enter the room, and you can enter the room only once.

 

How can you tell which switch turns on which lamp?

 

:)

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You’re in a room with two doors. There’s a guard at each door. One door is the exit, but behind the other door is something that will kill you. You’re told that one guard always tells the truth and the other guard always lies. You don’t know which guard is which. You are allowed to ask one question to either of the guards to determine which door is the exit.
 
What question should you ask?

 

I'm not one for these types of riddles;

 

The only answer I can think of is, "Can you please open the door?", since there is a guard there to protect me. I doubt I am right.

 

The coins one is from Columbo, so that spoils it for me.

 

 

You’re standing in a hallway with three light switches on the wall.  Each light switch turns on a different lamp inside an adjacent closed room. The door is closed to the room, and you can’t see inside.  You can’t open the door except to enter the room, and you can enter the room only once.

 
How can you tell which switch turns on which lamp?

 

Again, this seems like a red-herring, since the lamp is in an "adjacent" room "next to the switch" then don't you just switch it on and open the door? Each is the one adjacent to the door? (three rooms)

 

But if you are stating that there are three lamps in the one room then I'm stumped so let me think. Lol. Is it something along the lines of switching the lights on, entering the room, then go out of the room, determine which light is which by putting them off, then closing the door?

 

(too easy though)

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With the light riddle, there are too many unknowns. Can I for example, leave the door open? Can I mess with the switches only before I enter the room? Is there a certain amount of times I can use the switches? If a riddle is open-ended it won't work, like when I cocked up the cylindrical bottles. ;) 

 

I ASSUME I am only allowed to put on the switches, enter the room, then leave and I have to close the door?

 

If I can leave the door open when I leave then I suppose I could switch two switches to, "on", go in the room, and that would give me the knowledge of the switch that was NOT one of those two that were switched on. Then I could take a light bulb out of one of the lights that were still on. Then when I left the room, I could put a switch back to "off". If a light does not go out I will know it is the lamp I took the bulb from. If a light does go out it will be the other light for that switch. so I will know which switch is which just buy putting one of the lights out because either it will go dark or the light will stay on, if you see what I mean, after memorizing which one I took the bulb from while I was in the room.

 

The thing which seems impossible to me with this type of riddle is I don't know what I am allowed to do and not do. If I am only allowed to go in the room, then leave and I must shut the door for example, then my solution is invalid.

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I'm not one for these types of riddles;

 

The only answer I can think of is, "Can you please open the door?", since there is a guard there to protect me. I doubt I am right.

 

 

Interesting take, not the normal solution though.

 

One guard only lies, one guard only tells the truth.

 

You have to play them against each other....

;)

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Again, this seems like a red-herring, since the lamp is in an "adjacent" room "

 

The fact that the room is adjacent/close is actually important.

 

next to the switch" then don't you just switch it on and open the door?

The door is closed, you can only open it once.

 

 

Each is the one adjacent to the door? (three rooms)

 

The three lamps are in one room.

 

But if you are stating that there are three lamps in the one room then I'm stumped so let me think. Lol. Is it something along the lines of switching the lights on, entering the room, then go out of the room, determine which light is which by putting them off, then closing the door?

 

(too easy though)

Something along those lines.

 

If if it were two switches and two lamps it would be rather easy. The switch flipped "on" would be the "on" lamp. The switch flipped "off" would be the off lamp.

 

Three lamps is trickier.  There is a four lamp riddle also.

 

With the light riddle, there are too many unknowns. Can I for example, leave the door open?

 

Sorry, the door is closed and you can only open it once to go in and check.

 

Can I mess with the switches only before I enter the room?

 

Yes, I encourage it

;)

 

Is there a certain amount of times I can use the switches?

 

You can flip them on for as long as you like. This is a clue.

 

If a riddle is open-ended it won't work, like when I cocked up the cylindrical bottles. ;) 

 

I ASSUME I am only allowed to put on the switches, enter the room, then leave and I have to close the door?

 

Yes..., well you should be able to figure it out when you enter the room. No need to come back out.

 

If I can leave the door open when I leave then I suppose I could switch two switches to, "on", go in the room, and that would give me the knowledge of the switch that was NOT one of those two that were switched on. Then I could take a light bulb out of one of the lights that were still on. Then when I left the room, I could put a switch back to "off". If a light does not go out I will know it is the lamp I took the bulb from. If a light does go out it will be the other light for that switch. so I will know which switch is which just buy putting one of the lights out because either it will go dark or the light will stay on, if you see what I mean, after memorizing which one I took the bulb from while I was in the room.

 

This would work if you could go in and out of the room.

 

The thing which seems impossible to me with this type of riddle is I don't know what I am allowed to do and not do. If I am only allowed to go in the room, then leave and I must shut the door for example, then my solution is invalid.

Another hint: this riddle assumes the lamps are using the older incandescent bulbs.  How are they different from newer bulbs?

 

Good Luck!

;)

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I've now read the heat-answer, partially, unfortunately, (kind of accidentally while googling similar riddles)

 

"and you can only enter the room once" in my mind doesn't really translate to; "you can't come out", which I guess thrown me off. (sloppy premise that's for sure.)

 

I like my own solution better. :) I would create this riddle with the room at the end of a hallway and you can leave the door open on the way out, but obviously can't see the contents of the room clearly, thus the removal of the bulb guarantees a clear-cut deduction. :P Now that's clever. 

 

:checklist: ;)

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Here are three more, the first one is also an old classic:
 
1.
You’re in a room with two doors. There’s a guard at each door. One door is the exit, but behind the other door is something that will kill you. You’re told that one guard always tells the truth and the other guard always lies. You don’t know which guard is which. You are allowed to ask one question to either of the guards to determine which door is the exit.
 
What question should you ask?
 

 

 

 

I'm not one for these types of riddles;

 

The only answer I can think of is, "Can you please open the door?", since there is a guard there to protect me. I doubt I am right.

 

 

 

Just to be clear, the correct answer would be to ask either guard:

“What would the other guard say is the safe door?†or

“If I asked the other guard which door is the safe one, what would he say?â€

 

From there you would choose the opposite door.

:)

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I've now read the heat-answer, partially, unfortunately, (kind of accidentally while googling similar riddles)

 

"and you can only enter the room once" in my mind doesn't really translate to; "you can't come out", which I guess thrown me off. (sloppy premise that's for sure.)

 

I like my own solution better. :) I would create this riddle with the room at the end of a hallway and you can leave the door open on the way out, but obviously can't see the contents of the room clearly, thus the removal of the bulb guarantees a clear-cut deduction. :P Now that's clever. 

 

:checklist:  ;)

 

And for the light switch one, the solution would be turn on the first switch for a couple minutes, and then turn it back off.  Then turn on the second switch and enter the room.

The lamp that is off with a hot light bulb would belong to the first switch.

The lamp that is on would belong to the second switch.

The lamp that is off with a cold ( or room temperature) light bulb would belong to the third switch.

 

Because when you turn on an incandescent light bulb for 5 minutes or so it gets very hot.  So basically even if the light bulb is turned off, from its heat you could tell that the lightbulb was on; very recently on.

 

The point was that you could figure the riddle out just by entering the room only once.  No need to go back and forth multiple times - messing with the switches.

 

The riddle assumes that the lamps are in good working order, so you are not figuring out if they work.  You are figuring out which switch goes to which lamp.

Like I said before, if it were two switches and two lamps it would be rather easy.

The switch flipped "on" would be connected to the lamp in the room that is "on".

The switch flipped "off†would be connected to the lamp in the room that is "off".

 

What you propose (unscrewing the light bulb) is more time consuming and a much simpler deductive process.  It’s not “thinking outside the boxâ€, which is kind of the purpose of the riddles.

 

Most of the time when you think of a lamp, you think visually, because it produces light.

But incandescent bulbs also produce heat, which people mostly think is almost a secondary characteristic of those light bulbs; it’s a different sensation (touch).

 

Also in the second riddle, pushing in the cork is also “thinking outside the box†because typically you don’t do that.

:)

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Here are a couple more, the first one is pretty easy though.

 

1.

Mr. Jones was travelling by train across the country.  One day he got off a train in Chicago and while passing through the station he met an old friend he had not seen in years. With his friend was a little girl.

 

"Well, I certainly am glad to see you," said Mr. Jones.

 

"Same here," said his friend. "Since I last saw you I've been married - to someone you never knew. This is my little girl."

 

"I'm glad to meet you," said Mr. Jones. "What's your name?"

 

"It's the same as my mother's," answered the little girl.

 

"Oh, then your name is Anne," said Mr. Jones.

 

How did he know?

 

 

 

2.

An American patrol captured three German prisoners, all in ragged clothes, and without identifying marks.

The American sergeant wanted to find out which one was an officer which two were privates. 

 

He knew from past experience that the officer would be sure to lie. 

He also knew that the privates would probably not lie.

 

The first prisoner he questioned murmured some guttural words and fainted.

 

The second prisoner pointed to the first and said:

He said he's a private.

That's true, both he and I are privates.

 

The third prisoner pointed to the second and said:

He's a liar!

 

Despite the prisoners' statements, the American sergeant soon figured out which German was the officer and which two were privates. 

 

How did he do it?

 

 

 

3.

You are walking through an unusual cave when suddenly there is a cave in.

Trapped in a small room, you gauge your situation.

You determine there are only three exits out of the cave.

 

The first exit has a hungry lion trapped in a room waiting for you.

The second exit is a large pit full of boiling hot lava.

The third exit is unstable, and the rock will crumble immediately on top of you if you step even a foot on the path. 

 

Where you are trapped, you are lucky enough to have ample air.  You were also carrying ample food and water, but after a month of being trapped you have decided it’s time to escape.

 

Which exit do you choose?

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Sneakyguy, I'm so sorry I forgot about this thread completely. (as it's in an area I don't check much, as it gets so little traffic so it just exited my memory.)

 

I might have a go at these later, but as I say it's mostly inventing riddles that I enjoy.

 

Number 1. He knew as his friend was her mother? (might try the rest later.)

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Is number 2 that the third person is the lying officer?

 

Because if the first person was the liar, then the following two people would both tell the truth and their story would match, so the first person can't be a liar, meaning the second person told the truth when he said;

 

"He said he's a private.That's true, both he and I are privates." 

 

The third person says; "He's a liar!" But the second person had to be telling the truth about person 1, meaning the third person is lying.

 

 

.....and now I edit to say I have now realized that if we know the first man is an honest private, the sergeant found out by asking him which one was the liar, when he had recovered from fainting. (that red-herring of him feinting got me, which they usually do I'm sad to say. Lol)

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I think number 3 is easy, the lion wouldn't have had food or water for a month so you it would be dead, so you go by way of the lion's den. :)

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Thought this was interesting.

 

So the teacher gives this question, kind of a trick question about fractions.

But the kid answered it correctly and still got it wrong:

 

Marty ate 4/6 of his pizza and Luis ate 5/6 of his pizza. Marty ate more pizza than Luis. How is that possible?

 

http://www.inquisitr.com/2930983/this-math-problem-about-pizza-is-making-the-internet-so-very-confused-and-irate/

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Thatsneakyguy: Marty ate 4/6 of his pizza and Luis ate 5/6 of his pizza. Marty ate more pizza than Luis. How is that possible?

 

Because Marty was eating a bigger pizza, perhaps? (seems that can only be the answer, I won't click on your link as I assume it give the answer?)

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Because Marty was eating a bigger pizza, perhaps? (seems that can only be the answer, I won't click on your link as I assume it give the answer?)

 

Yes, exactly.

 

But this is actually a true story, not a riddle.

 

Basically this teacher was teaching fractions, and handed out a worksheet/quiz.  So instead of writing a simple question - like "Which is bigger 4/6 or 5/6?" -  the question was turned into the pizza word problem.  It was kind of a trick question IMO.

 

So the kid thought it was a riddle, and answered like you did, but the teacher marked it wrong.

 

The link is the news article I was reading.

 

:)

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