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DrBlake

I Think, So Here I Am.

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Hello to anyone who cares to read this, it won't be a best seller so it won't be too long.  I am Dr. Derek P. Blake, I was born in Yeovil, in the English county of Somerset way back in the mists of 1944.  I was not the ideal school boy because I was too busy asking questions and left school with just a few English qualifications and one in art.  I entered into an apprenticeship with with the local aircraft factory and ended up in research and development department.  The factory gained a contract to work on the guidance system of the UK's ICBM Blue Steel and I was drafted in.  I must have done a good job as I gained a reputation, and later went to work for British Aerospace.

 

In 1972 I asked Jesus into my life but I didn't let Him in until 1975, when I gave my life to Him, having worked on several delivery systems, in 1982, I watched TV as my systems killed people in the Falklands war.  Feeling sick I resigned on the spot.  I took over the management of a government Youth Training Scheme for several years, finally I became an Assistant Chaplain at a local prison, which led me into my last job.  For the last fourteen years before I retired I was a senior manager with a Christian Housing Association that provided support, treatment, monitoring and accommodation for offenders, either leaving prison or on probation.

 

I came into the creation ministry around the late seventies, when, sick of arguing evolution, I decided to write a short book that justified evolution with Genesis 1, I failed and in the course converted myself to a creationist.  In the eighties I joined a UK organisation Creation Research and spoke regularly on the subject.  I now run New Creation Media, a mission that promotes creationism and supports the Bible in the science community.  I have three websites, one of which is a resource site where anyone can download materials free of charge, from Children's materials to to scientific papers and books.  We also produce leaflets and videos and other materials supporting the Christian faith.

 

Oh and by the way, I love to debate.

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Welcome and well met. May your beard never wither. 

 

I have already enjoyed some of your posts. It is interesting that you came to a position of creation in that way. It's clear you have accomplished many things. It is good to see a creation scientist on the board.

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I know a few people from your home town lol, they're all all in the navy. Crazy bunch.

 

Welcome aboard, shipper!

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Being from west Cornwall myself, I know Redruth pretty well too. Used to go watch the rugby there with my Dad.

 

Welcome, Derek

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Thanks for the welcome Keysi.

 

"I know a few people from your home town lol, they're all all in the navy. Crazy bunch."

 

Well yes, RNAS Caldrose is just a few miles way and I nearly went into the Navy myself, in fact I am the first generation of the Blake family not to go to sea for around four-hundred years.  We moved here in May 2014 after five years of retirement in the Greek island of Lesvos, lived just two-hundred meters from the sea there, I have always felt an affinity to the ocean.

 

Thanks for the welcome Wibble, I'm a rugby fan my self, been glued to the TV for the pst few weeks with the six nations.

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Yeovilton itself is also a massive naval airbase these days.

 

Good choice not joining the navy, their uniform is horrendous :P

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Yeovilton itself is also a massive naval airbase these days.

 

Good choice not joining the navy, their uniform is horrendous :P

Indeed it is Keysi, I used to work there back in the sixties, Westland Aircraft had a couple of WWII hangers there they used for research, like the fuel system, etc, stuff that was either dangerous or top secret, the base had better security that Westland works.

 

Uniform-wise, I quite like the officer style, my Dad was a Royal Marine officer and I used to love his uniform when he got dressed up for reunions.  These days the day uniform looks scruffy in all the services.

 

Do you know Yeovilton?

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I have been on a passing visit, but never been based there. I'm in the RAf and for the next month and a bit based right down south. Though pretty soon I'm back off up to the motherland :P

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Welcome again.

 

Thanks for the background info.  I'll be looking forward to some interesting conversations.

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I have been on a passing visit, but never been based there. I'm in the RAf and for the next month and a bit based right down south. Though pretty soon I'm back off up to the motherland :P

Way back in the sixties, the RAF used to have a section of Yeovilton, it was used as one of the alternating 'V-bomber' (Vulcan, Victor and the lesser known Valiant heavy and medium bombers) bases, which was handy for us as we were working on the Blue Steel stand off bomb.  I was fortunate enough to actually fly in the Vulcan, quite an experience, not the least of which was actually boarding the machine,  definitely not designed for human comfort.  The Vulcan has always held a special place in my heart, I did so much work in her, so it was quite emotional when they retired the old lady a couple pf months ago.  I felt the same when they withdrew the air-worthiness cert for Concorde, I did so much work on that plane.  My team designed the Major Fatigue-test Rig right at the start, I worked on the control systems for the c-surfaces and the fast refueling system, I was at Filton when she took her first flight, it was like giving birth.  Now I'm waffling.

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Welcome again.

 

Thanks for the background info.  I'll be looking forward to some interesting conversations.

Me too Piasan, I have been a member of another creation group, 'Creation Conversations' but they have just banned 'facts and evidence' that contradict their very narrow 'Statement of Faith', which I actually subscribe to, but banning facts is an offense in my book and cannot tolerate it.  We need to explain those fact in the light of the Bible, not ban then on pain of expulsion, so I left.  It's good to find a site where debate takes place.

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Welcome to the forum Derek. Always nice to meet another drummer; played drums in high school marching band and concert/symphonic band, and after high school I did some stuff with hand drums specifically djembe. While I played the drum set for several years I was never in a garage style band. 

 

If you don't mind I have an astronomy question for a YEC, and while I don't mind anyone chiming in (perhaps a new thread is in order) I would like to hear your take on it given your background. 

 

A star gets its energy by fusing hydrogen into helium (and helium into carbon etc etc). If we turn back the clock it is reasonable to think that in the past stars wouldn't have as many "metals" (elements higher than helium) in its composition. As time moves forward we would expect stars to have a higher metallicity as more metals are being produced by stars that then explode or otherwise shed their layers into space which are then used to form new stars. As far as I know the further back in time you look (it takes time for light to traverse cosmic distances) the stars have less and less metallicity. Since every scientific indication is that stars live a long time (IIRC the most massive blue stars live roughly 100,000 years), this trend in the different metallicities indicates that a substantial amount of time has past in the observable universe. How would you reconcile this metallicity trend (or the distribution of population I, II, and III stars throughout the universe) in a YEC paradigm? 

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Welcome to the forum Derek. Always nice to meet another drummer; played drums in high school marching band and concert/symphonic band, and after high school I did some stuff with hand drums specifically djembe. While I played the drum set for several years I was never in a garage style band. 

 

If you don't mind I have an astronomy question for a YEC, and while I don't mind anyone chiming in (perhaps a new thread is in order) I would like to hear your take on it given your background. 

 

A star gets its energy by fusing hydrogen into helium (and helium into carbon etc etc). If we turn back the clock it is reasonable to think that in the past stars wouldn't have as many "metals" (elements higher than helium) in its composition. As time moves forward we would expect stars to have a higher metallicity as more metals are being produced by stars that then explode or otherwise shed their layers into space which are then used to form new stars. As far as I know the further back in time you look (it takes time for light to traverse cosmic distances) the stars have less and less metallicity. Since every scientific indication is that stars live a long time (IIRC the most massive blue stars live roughly 100,000 years), this trend in the different metallicities indicates that a substantial amount of time has past in the observable universe. How would you reconcile this metallicity trend (or the distribution of population I, II, and III stars throughout the universe) in a YEC paradigm? 

Hi Goku, good to meet you.  I started drumming in the last year of High School when a few of us got together because one of my friends found a banjo and a guitar in his loft space (a good reason to form a band LOL) I bought a washboard and we played 'skiffle'.  Later in college we changed into a traditional jazz band and I bought second hand drums a bit at a time.  That was during the sixties when here in the UK we had the 'Trad Fad' and we did well and hot a lot of gigs.  When I became a Christian I changed over to worship music, learned to play guitar and played both up until 2008 then retired from playing.

 

Your question is a BIG question, and I have developed a model over the last ten years, which I am hoping to publish this year.  We need to go right back to the event horizon of the universe, or the singularity point.  To put it as briefly as possible, I believe that God only actually created once (from nothing).  Both the Bible and mainstream science suggests that that singularity appeared in a condition of total void, where there was no time, matter or space (dimension).  When matter was introduced into those conditions it would instantly create both time and space, you cannot have matter without time and dimension.  Once that happened, like gas it would have immediately expanded to fill every possible volume, which didn't exist, there being neither space or time there would be no speed limit as to how fast the universe expanded.  A paper was published last year that shows that the initial universe expanded at many hundreds of factors of the speed of light, and, briefly, I believe the closer to the universe's boundary the faster stars and then galaxies developed.  Speed, even the speed of light, is expressed as time and distance, if those two elements are missing then the universe id free to expand at an almost unlimited rate.  We also need to take into consideration the now proven fact that spacial fabric exists (dark matter) and that this fabric density has changed as the universe expanded. 

 

Basically there is an illusion of long ages due to some of the properties of light.  The model seems to work but there is still much that is not understood.  I hope this at least partially answers your question.  I wonder how much physics you know, I don't want to teach granny to suck eggs here.

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Hello Peter!  :)

 

 

Here are a couple of sites you might find interesting:

 

National Geographic Photo of the day

NASA Astronomy Photo of the day

 

They have new pictures everyday.

 

 

Welcome to this forum! 

Thanks Guy, but who is Peter?  The composite of Orion (my favorite constellation because it is so interesting and so much within its borders), did you know that the three stars in the belt are actually drifting apart?  Well God told Job that over three and a half thousand years ago, a fact that science only found out in the last century. [Read Job chapter thirty-eight]

 

Thank you for your welcome.

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Thanks Guy, but who is Peter?  The composite of Orion (my favorite constellation because it is so interesting and so much within its borders), did you know that the three stars in the belt are actually drifting apart?  Well God told Job that over three and a half thousand years ago, a fact that science only found out in the last century. [Read Job chapter thirty-eight]

 

Thank you for your welcome.

 

Ugh!

Sorry Derek!

 

:blush:

 

For some reason I thought your name was Peter.  I guess I need some coffee or something. :kaffeetrinker:  

 

I heard that about Orion, one of my favorites also.  I wish I could see it more often; I often go camping in the summer and it's usually not visible by then. 

Take Care

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Ugh!

Sorry Derek!

 

:blush:

 

For some reason I thought your name was Peter.  I guess I need some coffee or something. :kaffeetrinker:  

 

I heard that about Orion, one of my favorites also.  I wish I could see it more often; I often go camping in the summer and it's usually not visible by then. 

Take Care

Yes indeed, I am not sure what your latitude is but for most of the Northern hemisphere all or part of the constellation is hidden during the spring and summer months.  The ancient Egyptians looked upon it as a symbol of resurrection because it dies and returns, they even laid out the great pyramids in the line of the three stars in the belt of Orion.  It has also fascinated me for years and I have spent many hours studying the area of sky with it's nebulae, the birthplace of stars.

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I debated an athiest that tried to down play that Job verse: Canst thou bind the sweet influences of Pleiades, or loose the bands of Orion? He was trying to say that all stars move apart and that it was not even a part of a reason for the existence of God...nothing more than a guess.

 

Also, Amos 5:8: Seek him that maketh the seven stars and Orion, and turneth the shadow of death into the morning, and maketh the day dark with night: that calleth for the waters of the sea, and poureth them out upon the face of the earth: The LORD is his name

 

I used the following as evidence that Pleiades is bound and Orion is loosed:

 

Isabel Lewis of the United States Naval Observatory says that astronomers have identified 250 stars as actual members of the Pleiades, all sharing in a common motion and moving through space in the same direction. Dr. Robert J. Trumpler of the Lick Observatory has confirmed that Job 38:31 is actually a true statement. Over 25,000 individual measurements of the Pleiades stars are now available, and their study led to the important discovery that the whole cluster is moving in a southeasterly direction. “This leaves no doubt that the Pleiades are… a system in which the stars are bound together by a close kinship.†But concerning Orion’s Belt, for which God told Job He arranged an opposite scenario, the stars are rapidly moving apart from one another. The belt viewed from Earth consists of an almost perfect straight line, a row of a few second-magnitude stars about equally spaced, each star traveling in different directions at different speeds. Astronomer Garrett P. Serviss has said that “In the course of time, however, the two right-hand stars, Mintaka and Alnilam, will approach each other and form a naked-eye double; but the third, Alnitak, will drift away eastward so that the band will no longer exist.â€

 

Welcome aboard. I appreciate your comments. Maybe you can share some of your thoughts about how chalk could form during Noah's flood in the chalk thread. My point in that thread was that there were calm waters due to the word asswaged in Genesis 8 as well as in Job 16:6, the thought being that coccoliliths require calm waters to produce chalk. Regards!

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Hi Goku, good to meet you.  I started drumming in the last year of High School when a few of us got together because one of my friends found a banjo and a guitar in his loft space (a good reason to form a band LOL) I bought a washboard and we played 'skiffle'.  Later in college we changed into a traditional jazz band and I bought second hand drums a bit at a time.  That was during the sixties when here in the UK we had the 'Trad Fad' and we did well and hot a lot of gigs.  When I became a Christian I changed over to worship music, learned to play guitar and played both up until 2008 then retired from playing.

 

Your question is a BIG question, and I have developed a model over the last ten years, which I am hoping to publish this year.  We need to go right back to the event horizon of the universe, or the singularity point.  To put it as briefly as possible, I believe that God only actually created once (from nothing).  Both the Bible and mainstream science suggests that that singularity appeared in a condition of total void, where there was no time, matter or space (dimension).  When matter was introduced into those conditions it would instantly create both time and space, you cannot have matter without time and dimension.  Once that happened, like gas it would have immediately expanded to fill every possible volume, which didn't exist, there being neither space or time there would be no speed limit as to how fast the universe expanded.  A paper was published last year that shows that the initial universe expanded at many hundreds of factors of the speed of light, and, briefly, I believe the closer to the universe's boundary the faster stars and then galaxies developed.  Speed, even the speed of light, is expressed as time and distance, if those two elements are missing then the universe id free to expand at an almost unlimited rate.  We also need to take into consideration the now proven fact that spacial fabric exists (dark matter) and that this fabric density has changed as the universe expanded. 

 

Basically there is an illusion of long ages due to some of the properties of light.  The model seems to work but there is still much that is not understood.  I hope this at least partially answers your question.  I wonder how much physics you know, I don't want to teach granny to suck eggs here.

 

It is a pleasure to meet you as well. I started drumming in 5th grade when we were told that if we joined the school band we would get out of regular school instruction for two hours a week; a noble reason to pick up an instrument. Before I was an atheist I was a leader (co-founded) a ministry through my local church centered on African style drumming to bring the community together. 

 

The beauty about my question is that we are using metallicity as a proxy for an old or young universe, so as long as the speed of light is not instantaneous or something it is a non issue I think. For example our own sun is considered a third generation star, so in order for our sun to exist it must have been preceded by two generations of stars and that takes time. Far too much time for YEC. 

 

A similar style question would be that the mass of a star determines how long the star has to live (or how it progresses through the H-R diagram as a function of time). So if you plot all the stars in a cluster on the H-R diagram it should correspond to a specific pattern based on how old the star cluster is. Astronomers do this all the time and get back ages that are in the millions or billions of years. Doing something like this is virtually independent of any speed of light disagreement. 

 

My understanding of physics leaves much to be desired, but I think I have a decent conceptual grasp of everything discussed so far. 

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It is a pleasure to meet you as well. I started drumming in 5th grade when we were told that if we joined the school band we would get out of regular school instruction for two hours a week; a noble reason to pick up an instrument. Before I was an atheist I was a leader (co-founded) a ministry through my local church centered on African style drumming to bring the community together. 

 

The beauty about my question is that we are using metallicity as a proxy for an old or young universe, so as long as the speed of light is not instantaneous or something it is a non issue I think. For example our own sun is considered a third generation star, so in order for our sun to exist it must have been preceded by two generations of stars and that takes time. Far too much time for YEC. 

 

A similar style question would be that the mass of a star determines how long the star has to live (or how it progresses through the H-R diagram as a function of time). So if you plot all the stars in a cluster on the H-R diagram it should correspond to a specific pattern based on how old the star cluster is. Astronomers do this all the time and get back ages that are in the millions or billions of years. Doing something like this is virtually independent of any speed of light disagreement. 

 

My understanding of physics leaves much to be desired, but I think I have a decent conceptual grasp of everything discussed so far. 

Unfortunately Goku, we observe and measure everything from our point in time and space, which does not always provide the real picture.  You will have seen the balloon effect, where any two points on the surface of the balloon move apart much faster than the air molecules in the centre of the balloon.  However in our case the inflation is rather like filling a balloon with some gas and placing it in a vacuum chamber and gradually increase the vacuum.  The balloon will expand, but now the gas inside the balloon changes density, the molecules also spreading out, so we now not only have different rates of expansion between the centre and the surface, we also have a changing 'fabric' (dark matter).  Despite the conditions locally being relatively constant, in other localities the rate of change is huge.

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Unfortunately Goku, we observe and measure everything from our point in time and space, which does not always provide the real picture.  You will have seen the balloon effect, where any two points on the surface of the balloon move apart much faster than the air molecules in the centre of the balloon.  However in our case the inflation is rather like filling a balloon with some gas and placing it in a vacuum chamber and gradually increase the vacuum.  The balloon will expand, but now the gas inside the balloon changes density, the molecules also spreading out, so we now not only have different rates of expansion between the centre and the surface, we also have a changing 'fabric' (dark matter).  Despite the conditions locally being relatively constant, in other localities the rate of change is huge.

 

My understanding of the expansion is that it is caused by dark energy, which I thought is supposed to have a relatively consistent density throughout the universe which is related to the universe's isotropy and homogeneity. I subscribe to the lambda CDM model by the way. So the idea that the universe has a center and that the edges expand faster than the center is foreign to me. It's not that gas is expanding to fill a vacuum, rather space itself is expanding and the gas is just along for the ride. I personally prefer the bread dough analogy to the balloon, but both are just analogies and shouldn't be taken too literally in my opinion. 

 

I am confused on your use of dark matter. My understanding is that dark matter (once you account for MACHOs that are hard to detect which artificially raises the amount of dark matter in cosmological surveys) is a non-baryonic substance(s) of matter that does not interact with the electromagnetic force. So I don't know what you mean by dark matter being related to the fabric of space, can you expand on what you're talking about there? 

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Welcome to the forum Derek, I hope you enjoy your time here :)

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My understanding of the expansion is that it is caused by dark energy, which I thought is supposed to have a relatively consistent density throughout the universe which is related to the universe's isotropy and homogeneity. I subscribe to the lambda CDM model by the way. So the idea that the universe has a center and that the edges expand faster than the center is foreign to me. It's not that gas is expanding to fill a vacuum, rather space itself is expanding and the gas is just along for the ride. I personally prefer the bread dough analogy to the balloon, but both are just analogies and shouldn't be taken too literally in my opinion. 

 

I am confused on your use of dark matter. My understanding is that dark matter (once you account for MACHOs that are hard to detect which artificially raises the amount of dark matter in cosmological surveys) is a non-baryonic substance(s) of matter that does not interact with the electromagnetic force. So I don't know what you mean by dark matter being related to the fabric of space, can you expand on what you're talking about there? 

Hi Goku, the problem is that no one really knows how this works, simply because we cannot replicate the conditions anywhere in this universe, we can only make guesses based on how things work within our universe, which may be totally wrong. Whatever the fabric of space consists of, dark matter or some other unknown substance, we just know it's there and calling it 'Dark Matter' is just a label that may not be accurate.  So my hypothesis is conjecture in the light of what the Bible tells me, there is much of the CDM that I would subscribe to, but it always surprises people how little cosmology doesn't know, hypotheses are often assumed to be fact.  We have only just found detectable evidence that that fabric actually exists with the recent detection of Gravitational waves, because waves need a medium to transmit, but that was also suggested by the wave property of light.

 

Some cosmologists suggest that this 'fabric' of space is made from dark matter, who knows if this is true or not, however, if indeed there is a boundary of the universe and if beyond that boundary there is neither space nor time, then the universe can expand until the universe runs out of energy.  If the universe is expanding, we must assume that there is something tangible to expand, or as the Bible puts it 'to stretch', on the basis that we 'cannot stretch nothing'.  The universe could not have been created in space, because the fabric would not have allowed that expansion, especially under the understanding that it is the fabric, or dark matter, that holds the galaxies in place.  Every principle says that if we stretch something it becomes thinner, and I can see no convincing evidence that shows otherwise.

 

As to the balloon illustration, I would agree, and the illustration I have used when lecturing was what call the 'Muffin' hypothesis, which is full of chocolate chips or currants, which represents spacial objects.  The chips in the centre hardly move but the ouret ones move more rapidly away from each other (relatively).   This gives us an almost constancy at the centre (even if we are somewhere close to the universal centre which the logically must be if the universe's singularity occured at a point in time or space - an event horizon) but retains residue expansion locally. In reality, although CERN has found a new particle, it is far from clear if they have indeed found the so called 'God Particle' the theoretical Higgs Boson. we just have to wait until this is confirmed in reverse observation, we can say this is the particle but until we see it doing what we say it does, it could be fairy dust.

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Welcome to the forum Derek, I hope you enjoy your time here :)

Thanks Gilbo, I think I might when I get time to post. 

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My understanding of the expansion is that it is caused by dark energy, which I thought is supposed to have a relatively consistent density throughout the universe which is related to the universe's isotropy and homogeneity. I subscribe to the lambda CDM model by the way. So the idea that the universe has a center and that the edges expand faster than the center is foreign to me. It's not that gas is expanding to fill a vacuum, rather space itself is expanding and the gas is just along for the ride. I personally prefer the bread dough analogy to the balloon, but both are just analogies and shouldn't be taken too literally in my opinion. 

 

I am confused on your use of dark matter. My understanding is that dark matter (once you account for MACHOs that are hard to detect which artificially raises the amount of dark matter in cosmological surveys) is a non-baryonic substance(s) of matter that does not interact with the electromagnetic force. So I don't know what you mean by dark matter being related to the fabric of space, can you expand on what you're talking about there? 

I forgot to say one part of the lambda CDM model that I do not subscribe to is the static universe element.  I am quite sure that the fact of the universe's expansion has been proved at this point, as the Bible and says and as Redshift shows.

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